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Título

Risk factors associated with the prevalence of tuberculosis-like lesions in fenced wild boar and red deer in South Central Spain

Autor Vicente, Joaquín ; Höfle, Ursula ; Garrido, Joseba M.; Fernández de Mera, Isabel G.; Acevedo, Pelayo ; Juste, Ramón A.; Barral, Marta; Gortázar, Christian
Palabras clave Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex
Red deer
Risk factors
Tuberculosis
Wild boar
Fecha de publicación 11-abr-2007
EditorEDP Sciences
Citación Veterinary Research 38(3): 451-464 (2007)
ResumenIn recent decades the management of large game mammals has become increasingly intensive in south central Spain (SCS), resulting in complex epidemiological scenarios for disease maintenance, and has probably impeded schemes to eradicate tuberculosis (TB) in domestic livestock. We conducted an analysis of risk factors which investigated associations between the pattern of tuberculosis-like lesions (TBL) in wild boar (Sus scrofa) and red deer (Cervus elaphus) across 19 hunting estates from SCS and an extensive set of variables related to game management, land use and habitat structure. The aggregation of wild boar at artificial watering sites was significantly associated with an increasing risk of detecting TBL in both species, which probably relates to enhanced opportunities for transmission. Aggregation of wild boar at feeding sites was also associated with increased risks of TBL in red deer. Hardwood Quercus spp. forest availability was marginally associated with an increased risk of TB in both species, whereas scrubland cover was associated with a reduced individual risk of TBL in the wild boar. It is concluded that management practices that encourage the aggregation of hosts, and some characteristics of Mediterranean habitats could increase the frequency and probability of both direct and indirect transmission of TB. These findings are of concern for both veterinary and public health authorities, and reveal tuberculosis itself as a potential limiting factor for the development and sustainability of such intensive game management systems in Spanish Mediterranean habitats.
Descripción 14 pages, 2 figures.-- PMID: 17425933 [PubMed].-- Article available Open Access at the publisher's site: http://www.vetres.org/articles/vetres/abs/2007/03/v07069/v07069.html
Printed version published in issue May-Jun 2007.
Versión del editorhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1051/vetres:2007002
URI http://hdl.handle.net/10261/9781
DOI10.1051/vetres:2007002
ISSN0928-4249
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