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Título : Exopolysaccharides produced by probiotic strains modify the adhesion of probiotics and enteropathogens to human intestinal mucus
Autor : Ruas-Madiedo, Patricia ; Gueimonde Fernández, Miguel ; Margolles Barros, Abelardo ; González de los Reyes-Gavilán, Clara ; Salminen, Seppo
Palabras clave : Exopolisacáridos
Probióticos
Poliósido
Extracecular
Fecha de publicación : 2006
Editor: International Association for Food Protection
Citación : Journal of food protection 69(89): 2011-2015 (2006)
Resumen: Exopolysaccharides (EPSs) are exocellular polymers present in the surface of many bacteria, including Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium. The genome sequence of several strains revealed the presence of EPS-encoding genes. However, the physiological role that EPSs play in the bacterial ecology still remains uncertain. In this study, we have assessed the effect of EPSs produced by Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG, Bifidobacterium longum NB667, and Bifidobacterium animalis IPLA-R1 on the adhesion of probiotic and enteropathogen strains to human intestinal mucus. The EPS fraction GG had no significant effect on the adhesion of L. rhamnosus GG and B. animalis IPLA-R1. However, the EPS fractions NB667 and IPLA-R1 significantly reduced the adherence of both probiotic strains. In contrast, the three EPS fractions increased the adhesion of Enterobacter sakazakii ATCC 29544 and Escherichia coli NCTC 8603. Higher adherence of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium ATCC 29631 and Clostridium difficile ATCC 9689 was detected in the presence of the EPS fractions GG and NB667. In general, these effects were obtained at EPS concentrations of up to 5 mg/ml, and they were EPS dose dependent. The competitive exclusion of probiotics in the presence of EPS could suggest the involvement of these biopolymers in the adhesion to mucus. The increase in the adherence of enteropathogens could be explained if components of the pathogen surface are able to bind to specific EPSs and the bound EPSs are able to adhere to mucus. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first work reporting the effect of EPSs from probiotics on bacterial adhesion properties
URI : http://hdl.handle.net/10261/7029
ISSN: 0362-028X
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