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dc.contributor.authorPalacio, Sara-
dc.contributor.authorJohnson, David-
dc.contributor.authorEscudero, Adrián-
dc.contributor.authorMontserrat-Martí, Gabriel-
dc.date.accessioned2013-01-29T10:28:38Z-
dc.date.available2013-01-29T10:28:38Z-
dc.date.issued2012-01-
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Arid Environments 76: 128-132 (2012)es_ES
dc.identifier.issn0140-1963-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10261/65372-
dc.description18 páginas, 1 tabla, 2 figurases_ES
dc.description.abstract[EN] Gypsum soils are among the most restrictive substrates for plant life, yet the mechanisms of plant adaptation to gypsum are still poorly understood. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) can improve host plant nutrition and survival in stressful environments but little is known about the ubiquity and function of AMF in plants that grow in gypsum soils, both specialists and generalists. Previous studies indicate that most gypsophiles (specialists) show much higher concentration of nutrients than gypsovags (generalists), hence our hypothesis was that this would be related to increased mycorrhizal colonisation in gypsum specialists. We therefore quantified colonisation of the roots by mycorrhizal arbuscules (AC), vesicles (VC) and hyphae (HC) in six species of gypsophiles and six species of gypsovags growing in gypsum outcrops. Both groups of plants showed significant differences in AC, VC and HC but in contrast to our hypothesis, colonisation was greater in gypsovags than in gypsophiles. The extent of AMF colonisation does not seem to explain the distinctively high nutrient concentrations reported for gypsophiles. Our results indicate that increased AM colonisation could be a mechanism allowing non-specialist plants to cope with the restrictive conditions of gypsum.es_ES
dc.description.sponsorshipThis research was supported by DGA project GA-LC-011/2008. Authors are indebted to Elena Lahoz for help with AMF clearing and staining and to Melchor Maestro for chemical analyses. Joe Morton provided useful advice on AMF clearing and staining. Two anonymous referees greatly improved earlier versions of the manuscript. S. P. was founded by a JAE-Doc (CSIC).es_ES
dc.language.isoenges_ES
dc.publisherElsevieres_ES
dc.rightsopenAccesses_ES
dc.subjectArbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF)es_ES
dc.subjectEdaphic endemismes_ES
dc.subjectGypsum soilses_ES
dc.subjectGypsophileses_ES
dc.subjectMediterranean semi-arid environmentses_ES
dc.titleRoot colonisation by AM fungi differs between gypsum specialist and non-specialist plants: Links to the gypsophile behavioures_ES
dc.typeartículoes_ES
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.jaridenv.2011.08.019-
dc.description.peerreviewedPeer reviewedes_ES
dc.relation.publisherversionhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jaridenv.2011.08.019es_ES
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