English   español  
Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10261/65090
Share/Impact:
Statistics
logo share SHARE logo core CORE   Add this article to your Mendeley library MendeleyBASE

Visualizar otros formatos: MARC | Dublin Core | RDF | ORE | MODS | METS | DIDL
Exportar a otros formatos:

Title

High gene flow on a continental scale in the polyandrous Kentish plover Charadrius alexandrinus

AuthorsKüpper, Clemes; Edwards, Scott V.; Kosztolányi, András; Alrashidi, M.; Burke, Terry; Herrmann, P.; Argüelles-Tico, A.; Amat, Juan A. ; Amezian, M.; Rocha, Afonso; Hötker, Hermann; Ivanov, A.; Chernicko, J.; Székely, Tamás
Issue Date2012
PublisherBlackwell Publishing
CitationMolecular Ecology 21: 5864- 5879 (2012)
AbstractGene flow promotes genetic homogeneity of species in time and space. Gene flow can be modulated by sex-biased dispersal that links population genetics to mating systems. We investigated the phylogeography of the widely distributed Kentish plover Charadrius alexandrinus. This small shorebird has a large breeding range spanning from Western Europe to Japan and exhibits an unusually flexible mating system with high female breeding dispersal. We analysed genetic structure and gene flow using a 427-bp fragment of the mitochondrial (mtDNA) control region, 21 autosomal microsatellite markers and a Z microsatellite marker in 397 unrelated individuals from 21 locations. We found no structure or isolation-by-distance over the continental range. However, island populations had low genetic diversity and were moderately differentiated from mainland locations. Genetic differentiation based on autosomal markers was positively correlated with distance between mainland and each island. Comparisons of uniparentally and biparentally inherited markers were consistent with female-biased gene flow. Maternally inherited mtDNA was less structured, whereas the Z-chromosomal marker was more structured than autosomal microsatellites. Adult males were more related than females within genetic clusters. Taken together, our results suggest a prominent role for polyandrous females in maintaining genetic homogeneity across large geographic distances. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.
URIhttp://hdl.handle.net/10261/65090
DOI10.1111/mec.12064
Identifiersdoi: 10.1111/mec.12064
issn: 0962-1083
Appears in Collections:(EBD) Artículos
Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat 
mec12064.pdf684,95 kBAdobe PDFThumbnail
View/Open
Show full item record
Review this work
 

Related articles:


WARNING: Items in Digital.CSIC are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.