Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10261/351500
Share/Export:
logo share SHARE logo core CORE BASE
Visualizar otros formatos: MARC | Dublin Core | RDF | ORE | MODS | METS | DIDL | DATACITE

Invite to open peer review
Title

Assessing mercury contamination in Southern Hemisphere marine ecosystems: The role of penguins as effective bioindicators

AuthorsGimeno Castells, Miriam; Rossell, Laia; Julià Melis, Laura CSIC ORCID; Giménez, Joan CSIC ORCID ; Sanpera, Carolina; Coll, Marta CSIC ORCID ; Bustamante, Paco; Ramírez Benítez, Francisco CSIC ORCID CVN
KeywordsBiomonitors
Dataset
Mercury
Meta-analysis
Pollutant
Seabirds
Issue DateFeb-2024
PublisherElsevier
CitationEnvironmental Pollution 343: 123159 (2024)
AbstractMercury (Hg) is a global pollutant known for its significant bioaccumulation and biomagnification capabilities, posing a particular threat to marine environments. Seabirds have been recognized as effective bioindicators of marine pollution, and, among them, penguins present a unique opportunity to serve as a single taxonomic group (Sphenisciformes) for monitoring Hg across distinct marine ecosystems in the Southern Hemisphere. In this study, we conducted a comprehensive systematic review of Hg concentrations, and performed a meta-analysis that took into account the various sources of uncertainty associated with Hg contamination in penguins. Beyond intrinsic species-specific factors shaping Hg levels, our results showed that the penguin community effectively reflects spatial patterns of Hg bioavailability. We identified geographic Hg hotspots in Australia, the Indian Ocean, and Tierra del Fuego, as well as coldspots in Perú and the South Atlantic. Furthermore, specific penguin species, namely the Southern Rockhopper (Eudyptes chrysocome) and Macaroni penguin (Eudyptes chrysolophus), are highlighted as particularly vulnerable to the toxic effects of Hg. Additionally, we identified knowledge gaps in geographic areas such as the Galápagos Islands, South Africa, and the coast of Chile, as well as in species including Fiordland (Eudyptes pachyrhynchus), Snares (Eudyptes robustus), Erect-crested (Eudyptes sclateri), Royal (Eudyptes schlegeli), Yellow-eyed (Megadyptes antipodes), and Galápagos (Spheniscus mendiculus) penguins. Overall, our study contributes to the growing body of literature emphasizing the role of penguins as bioindicators of Hg pollution, but it also highlights areas where further research and data collection are needed for a more comprehensive understanding of Hg contamination in marine ecosystems in the Southern Hemisphere
DescriptionThis study is a contribution of the ICM-TEF (Trophic Ecology Facility of the Institut de Ciències del Mar-CSIC).-- 10 pages, 5 figures.-- Data availability: Database available at DigitalCSIC: https://doi.org/10.20350/digitalCSIC/15722
Publisher version (URL)https://doi.org/10.1016/j.envpol.2023.123159
URIhttp://hdl.handle.net/10261/351500
DOI10.1016/j.envpol.2023.123159
ISSN0269-7491
E-ISSN1873-6424
Appears in Collections:(ICM) Artículos
(IEO) Artículos




Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat
Gimeno_et_al_2024.pdf5,11 MBAdobe PDFView/Open
Show full item record

CORE Recommender
sdgo:Goal

SCOPUSTM   
Citations

1
checked on May 14, 2024

Page view(s)

52
checked on May 20, 2024

Download(s)

86
checked on May 20, 2024

Google ScholarTM

Check

Altmetric

Altmetric


This item is licensed under a Creative Commons License Creative Commons