English   español  
Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10261/28943
Share/Impact:
Statistics
logo share SHARE logo core CORE   Add this article to your Mendeley library MendeleyBASE

Visualizar otros formatos: MARC | Dublin Core | RDF | ORE | MODS | METS | DIDL
Exportar a otros formatos:
Title

Seven Wnt homologues in Drosophila: a case study of the developing tracheae

AuthorsLlimargas, Marta ; Lawrence, Peter A.
Issue Date20-Nov-2001
PublisherNational Academy of Sciences (U.S.)
CitationProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the USA 98(25): 14487–14492 (2001)
AbstractSequencing of the Drosophila genome has revealed that there are “silent” homologues of many important genes—family members that were not detected by classic genetic approaches. Why have so many homologues been conserved during evolution? Perhaps each one has a different but important function in every system. Perhaps each one works independently in a different part of the body. Or, perhaps some are redundant. Here, we take one well known gene family and analyze how the individual members contribute to the making of one system, the tracheae. There are seven DWnt genes in the Drosophila genome, including wingless (wg). The wg gene helps to pattern the developing trachea but is not responsible for all Wnt functions there. We test each one of the seven DWnts in several ways and find evidence that wg and DWnt2 can function in the developing trachea: when both genes are removed together, the phenotype is identical or very similar to that observed when the Wnt pathway is shut down. DWnt2 is expressed near the tracheal cells in the embryo in a different pattern to wg but is also transduced through the canonical Wnt pathway. We find that the seven DWnt genes vary in their effectiveness in specific tissues, such as the tracheae, and, moreover, the epidermis and the tracheae respond to DWnt2 and Wg differently. We suggest that the main advantage of retaining a number of similar genes is that it allows more subtle forms of control and more flexibility during evolution.
Description6 pages, 5 figures.-- PMID: 11717401 [PubMed].-- PMCID: PMC64708.
Publisher version (URL)http://dx.doi.org/10.1073/pnas.251304398
URIhttp://hdl.handle.net/10261/28943
DOI10.1073/pnas.251304398
ISSN0027-8424
E-ISSN1091-6490
Appears in Collections:(IQAC) Artículos
Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat 
Llimargas_Marta_et_al.pdf703,45 kBAdobe PDFThumbnail
View/Open
Show full item record
Review this work
 

Related articles:


WARNING: Items in Digital.CSIC are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.