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Título

Diversification and Specialization of Plant RBR Ubiquitin Ligases

AutorMarín, Ignacio
Fecha de publicación14-jul-2010
EditorPublic Library of Science
CitaciónPLoS One 5(7): e11579 (2010)
ResumenBACKGROUND: RBR ubiquitin ligases are components of the ubiquitin-proteasome system present in all eukaryotes. They are characterized by having the RBR (RING - IBR - RING) supradomain. In this study, the patterns of emergence of RBR genes in plants are described. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Phylogenetic and structural data confirm that just four RBR subfamilies (Ariadne, ARA54, Plant I/Helicase and Plant II) exist in viridiplantae. All of them originated before the split that separated green algae from the rest of plants. Multiple genes of two of these subfamilies (Ariadne and Plant II) appeared in early plant evolution. It is deduced that the common ancestor of all plants contained at least five RBR genes and the available data suggest that this number has been increasing slowly along streptophyta evolution, although losses, especially of Helicase RBR genes, have also occurred in several lineages. Some higher plants (e. g. Arabidopsis thaliana, Oryza sativa) contain a very large number of RBR genes and many of them were recently generated by tandem duplications. Microarray data indicate that most of these new genes have low-level and sometimes specific expression patterns. On the contrary, and as occurs in animals, a small set of older genes are broadly expressed at higher levels. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The available data suggests that the dynamics of appearance and conservation of RBR genes is quite different in plants from what has been described in animals. In animals, an abrupt emergence of many structurally diverse RBR subfamilies in early animal history, followed by losses of multiple genes in particular lineages, occurred. These patterns are not observed in plants. It is also shown that while both plants and animals contain a small, similar set of essential RBR genes, the rest evolves differently. The functional implications of these results are discussed.
Descripción14 pages, 7 figures, 1 table. PMID: 20644651 [PubMed]PMCID: PMC2904391 Free PMC Article
Versión del editorhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0011579
URIhttp://hdl.handle.net/10261/26751
DOI10.1371/journal.pone.0011579.
ISSN1932-6203
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