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Title

Self-citations at the meso and individual levels:effects of different calculation methods

AuthorsCostas Comesaña, Rodrigo ; Van Leeuwen, Thed N.; Bordons, María
KeywordsSelf-citations
Micro-level
Meso-level
Individual scientists
Bibliometric indicators
Citation analysis
Issue Date17-Feb-2010
PublisherSpringer
CitationScientometrics 82:517–537(2010)
AbstractThis paper focuses on the study of self-citations at the meso and micro (individual) levels, on the basis of an analysis of the production (1994–2004) of individual researchers working at the Spanish CSIC in the areas of Biology and Biomedicine and Material Sciences. Two different types of self-citations are described: author self-citations (citations received from the author him/herself) and co-author self-citations (citations received from the researchers’ co-authors but without his/her participation). Self-citations do not play a decisive role in the high citation scores of documents either at the individual or at the meso level, which are mainly due to external citations. At micro-level, the percentage of self-citations does not change by professional rank or age, but differences in the relative weight of author and co-author self-citations have been found. The percentage of co-author self-citations tends to decrease with age and professional rank while the percentage of author self-citations shows the opposite trend. Suppressing author selfcitations from citation counts to prevent overblown self-citation practices may result in a higher reduction of citation numbers of old scientists and, particularly, of those in the highest categories. Author and co-author self-citations provide valuable information on the scientific communication process, but external citations are the most relevant for evaluative purposes. As a final recommendation, studies considering self-citations at the individual level should make clear whether author or total self-citations are used as these can affect researchers differently.
Description21 pages, 37 graphs, 5 tables.
Publisher version (URL)http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11192-010-0187-7
URIhttp://hdl.handle.net/10261/25794
DOI10.1007/s11192-010-0187-7
Appears in Collections:(CCHS-IEDCYT) Artículos
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