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Title

Gradients of Anthropogenic Nutrient Enrichment Alter N Composition and DOM Stoichiometry in Freshwater Ecosystems

AuthorsWymore, Adam S.; Johnes, Penny J.; Bernal, Susana CSIC ORCID ; Brookshire, E. N. Jack; Fazekas, Hannah M.; Helton, A. M.; Argerich, A.; Barnes, Rebecca T.; Coble, A. A.; Dodds, W. K.; Haq, Shahan; Johnson, S. L.; Jones, J. B.; Kaushal, S. S.; Kortelainen, Pirkko; López-Lloreda, Carla; Rodríguez-Cardona, Bianca M.; Spencer, Robert G. M.; Sullivan, Pamela L.; Yates, Christopher A.; McDowell, W. H.
Issue Date2021
PublisherAmerican Geophysical Union
CitationGlobal Biogeochemical Cycles 35 : e2021GB006953 (2021)
AbstractA comprehensive cross-biome assessment of major nitrogen (N) species that includes dissolved organic N (DON) is central to understanding interactions between inorganic nutrients and organic matter in running waters. Here, we synthesize stream water N chemistry across biomes and find that the composition of the dissolved N pool shifts from highly heterogeneous to primarily comprised of inorganic N, in tandem with dissolved organic matter (DOM) becoming more N-rich, in response to nutrient enrichment from human disturbances. We identify two critical thresholds of total dissolved N (TDN) concentrations where the proportions of organic and inorganic N shift. With low TDN concentrations (0–1.3 mg/L N), the dominant form of N is highly variable, and DON ranges from 0% to 100% of TDN. At TDN concentrations above 2.8 mg/L, inorganic N dominates the N pool and DON rarely exceeds 25% of TDN. This transition to inorganic N dominance coincides with a shift in the stoichiometry of the DOM pool, where DOM becomes progressively enriched in N and DON concentrations are less tightly associated with concentrations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC). This shift in DOM stoichiometry (defined as DOC:DON ratios) suggests that fundamental changes in the biogeochemical cycles of C and N in freshwater ecosystems are occurring across the globe as human activity alters inorganic N and DOM sources and availability. Alterations to DOM stoichiometry are likely to have important implications for both the fate of DOM and its role as a source of N as it is transported downstream to the coastal ocean.
DescriptionEste artículo contiene 11 páginas, 3 figuras, 1 tabla.
Publisher version (URL)https://doi.org/10.1029/2021GB006953
URIhttp://hdl.handle.net/10261/248550
ISSN0886-6236
E-ISSN1944-9224
Appears in Collections:(CEAB) Artículos
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