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Title

Determination of the concentration of IgG against the spike receptor-binding domain that predicts the viral neutralizing activity of convalescent plasma and serum against SARS-CoV-2

AuthorsSantiago, Llipsy; Uranga Murillo, Iratxe; Arias, Maykel; González Ramírez, Andrés Manuel; Macías-León, Javier; Moreo, Eduardo; Redrado, Sergio; García García, Ana; Taleb, V.; Lira-Navarrete, Erandi; Hurtado-Guerrero, R.; Aguiló, Nacho; Encabo-Berzosa, M. Mar; Hidalgo, Sandra; Gálvez Buerba, Eva Mª CSIC ORCID ; Ramírez-Labrada, Ariel; de Miguel, Diego; Benito, Rafael; Miranda, Patricia; Fernández Casanovas, Antonio; Domingo, José María; Serrano Barcos, Laura; Yuste, Cristina; Villanueva-Saz, Sergio; Paño, José Ramón; Pardo, Julián
KeywordsCoronavirus
SARS-CoV-2
IgG
Antibodies
Convalescent plasma
ELISA
Issue Date10-Mar-2021
PublisherMultidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute
CitationBiology 10(3): 208 (2021)
AbstractPassive immunization with hyperimmune plasma from convalescent patients has been proposed as a potentially useful treatment for COVID-19. Nevertheless, its efficacy in patients with COVID-19 remains uncertain. Thus, the establishment and validation of standardized methods that predict the viral neutralizing (VN) activity of plasma against SARS-CoV-2 is of utmost importance to appraise its therapeutic value. Using an in-house quantitative ELISA test and two independent cohorts with a total of 345 donors, we found that plasma and serum from most convalescent donors contained IgG antibodies specific to the spike receptor-binding domain (RBD) of SARS-CoV-2, with varying concentrations which correlate with previous disease severity and gender. Anti-RBD IgG plasma concentration significantly correlated with the plasma/serum VN activity against SARS-CoV-2 in vitro.
Several hundred millions of people have been diagnosed of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), causing millions of deaths and a high socioeconomic burden. SARS-CoV-2, the causative agent of COVID-19, induces both specific T- and B-cell responses, being antibodies against the virus detected a few days after infection. Passive immunization with hyperimmune plasma from convalescent patients has been proposed as a potentially useful treatment for COVID-19. Using an in-house quantitative ELISA test, we found that plasma from 177 convalescent donors contained IgG antibodies specific to the spike receptor-binding domain (RBD) of SARS-CoV-2, although at very different concentrations which correlated with previous disease severity and gender. Anti-RBD IgG plasma concentrations significantly correlated with the plasma viral neutralizing activity (VN) against SARS-CoV-2 in vitro. Similar results were found using an independent cohort of serum from 168 convalescent health workers. These results validate an in-house RBD IgG ELISA test in a large cohort of COVID-19 convalescent patients and indicate that plasma from all convalescent donors does not contain a high enough amount of anti-SARS-CoV-2-RBD neutralizing IgG to prevent SARS-CoV-2 infection in vitro. The use of quantitative anti-RBD IgG detection systems might help to predict the efficacy of the passive immunization using plasma from patients recovered from SARS-CoV-2.
Description4 figures, 1 table.
Publisher version (URL)http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/biology10030208
URIhttp://hdl.handle.net/10261/236971
DOI10.3390/biology10030208
E-ISSN2079-7737
Appears in Collections:(ICB) Artículos
(VICYT) Colección Especial COVID-19

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