English   español  
Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10261/220502
Share/Impact:
Statistics
logo share SHARE logo core CORE   Add this article to your Mendeley library MendeleyBASE

Visualizar otros formatos: MARC | Dublin Core | RDF | ORE | MODS | METS | DIDL | DATACITE
Exportar a otros formatos:

Title

Metagenomic analysis of a blood stain from the French revolutionary Jean-Paul Marat (1743–1793)

AuthorsDe-Dios, Toni; van Dorp, Lucy; Charlier, Philippe; Morfopoulou, Sofia; Lizano, Esther; Bon, Celine; Le Bitouzé, Corinne; Alvarez-Estape, Marina; Marqués-Bonet, Tomàs ; Balloux, François; Lalueza-Fox, Carles
KeywordsAncient DNA
Metagenomics
Infection
Issue DateJun-2020
PublisherElsevier
CitationInfection, Genetics and Evolution 80: 104209 (2020)
AbstractThe French revolutionary Jean-Paul Marat (1743–1793) was assassinated in 1793 in his bathtub, where he was trying to find relief from the debilitating skin disease he was suffering from. At the time of his death, Marat was annotating newspapers, which got stained with his blood and were subsequently preserved by his sister. We extracted and sequenced DNA from the blood stain and also from another section of the newspaper, which we used for comparison. Results from the human DNA sequence analyses were compatible with a heterogeneous ancestry of Marat, with his mother being of French origin and his father born in Sardinia. Metagenomic analyses of the non-human reads uncovered the presence of fungal, bacterial and low levels of viral DNA. Relying on the presence/absence of microbial species in the samples, we could cast doubt on several putative infectious agents that have been previously hypothesised as the cause of his condition but for which we detect not a single sequencing read. Conversely, some of the species we detect are uncommon as environmental contaminants and may represent plausible infective agents. Based on all the available evidence, we hypothesize that Marat may have suffered from a fungal infection (seborrheic dermatitis), possibly superinfected with bacterial opportunistic pathogens.
Publisher version (URL)http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.meegid.2020.104209
URIhttp://hdl.handle.net/10261/220502
Identifiersdoi: 10.1016/j.meegid.2020.104209
issn: 1567-1348
Appears in Collections:(IBE) Artículos
Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat 
blood_stain.pdf1,06 MBAdobe PDFThumbnail
View/Open
Show full item record
Review this work
 

Related articles:


WARNING: Items in Digital.CSIC are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.