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dc.contributor.authorLovas-Kiss, Ádámes_ES
dc.contributor.authorVincze, Orsolyaes_ES
dc.contributor.authorLökia, Viktores_ES
dc.contributor.authorPallér-Kapusia, Felíciaes_ES
dc.contributor.authorHalasi-Kovács, Bélaes_ES
dc.contributor.authorKovács, Gyulaes_ES
dc.contributor.authorGreen, Andy J.es_ES
dc.contributor.authorAndrás Lukács, Balázses_ES
dc.date.accessioned2020-07-08T07:28:31Z-
dc.date.available2020-07-08T07:28:31Z-
dc.date.issued2020-
dc.identifier.citationProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the USA, 2020es_ES
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10261/216183-
dc.description.abstractFish have somehow colonized isolated water bodies all over the world without human assistance. It has long been speculated that these colonization events are assisted by waterbirds, transporting fish eggs attached to their feet and feathers, yet empirical support for this is lacking. Recently, it was suggested that endozoochory (i.e., internal transport within the gut) might play a more important role, but only highly resistant diapause eggs of killifish have been found to survive passage through waterbird guts. Here, we performed a controlled feeding experiment, where developing eggs of two cosmopolitan, invasive cyprinids (common carp, Prussian carp) were fed to captive mallards. Live embryos of both species were retrieved from fresh feces and survived beyond hatching. Our study identifies an overlooked dispersal mechanism in fish, providing evidence for bird-mediated dispersal ability of soft-membraned eggs undergoing active development. Only 0.2% of ingested eggs survived gut passage, yet, given the abundance, diet, and movements of ducks in nature, our results have major implications for biodiversity conservation and invasion dynamics in freshwater ecosystems.es_ES
dc.language.isoenges_ES
dc.publisherNational Academy of Sciences (U.S.)es_ES
dc.relation.isversionofPublisher's versiones_ES
dc.rightsopenAccesses_ES
dc.subjectLong-distance dispersaes_ES
dc.subjectFreshwateres_ES
dc.subjectFish distributiones_ES
dc.subjectInvasiones_ES
dc.subjectEndozoochoryes_ES
dc.titleExperimental evidence of dispersal of invasive cyprinid eggs inside migratory waterfowles_ES
dc.typeartículoes_ES
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1073/pnas.2004805117-
dc.description.peerreviewedPeer reviewedes_ES
dc.relation.publisherversionwww.pnas.org/cgi/doi/10.1073/pnas.2004805117es_ES
dc.rights.licensehttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/es_ES
dc.relation.csices_ES
oprm.item.hasRevisionno ko 0 false*
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