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Title

Evaluation of the immunogenicity and efficacy of BCG and MTBVAC vaccines using a natural transmission model of tuberculosis

AuthorsRoy, Álvaro; Tomé, Irene; Romero, Beatriz; Lorente‑Leal, Víctor; Infantes-Lorenzo, José Antonio; Domínguez, Mercedes; Martín, Carlos; Aguiló, Nacho; Puentes, Eugenia; Rodríguez, Esteban; Juan, Lucía de; Risalde, María Ángeles; Gortázar, Christian ; Domínguez, Lucas; Bezos, Javier
Issue Date2019
PublisherBioMed Central
CitationVeterinary Research 50: 82 (2019)
AbstractEffective vaccines against tuberculosis (TB) are needed in order to prevent TB transmission in human and animal populations. Evaluation of TB vaccines may be facilitated by using reliable animal models that mimic host pathophysiology and natural transmission of the disease as closely as possible. In this study, we evaluated the immunogenicity and efficacy of two attenuated vaccines, BCG and MTBVAC, after each was given to 17 goats (2 months old) and then exposed for 9 months to goats infected with M. caprae. In general, MTBVAC-vaccinated goats showed higher interferon-gamma release than BCG vaccinated goats in response to bovine protein purified derivative and ESAT-6/CFP-10 antigens and the response was significantly higher than that observed in the control group until challenge. All animals showed lesions consistent with TB at the end of the study. Goats that received either vaccine showed significantly lower scores for pulmonary lymph nodes and total lesions than unvaccinated controls. Both MTBVAC and BCG vaccines proved to be immunogenic and effective in reducing severity of TB pathology caused by M. caprae. Our model system of natural TB transmission may be useful for evaluating and optimizing vaccines.
Publisher version (URL)https://doi.org/10.1186/s13567-019-0702-7
URIhttp://hdl.handle.net/10261/215539
DOI10.1186/s13567-019-0702-7
ISSN0928-4249
E-ISSN1297-9716
Appears in Collections:(IREC) Artículos
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