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Title

How evolution made the matrix punch at the multicellularity party

AuthorsRodríguez-Pascual, Fernando
Issue Date2019
PublisherAmerican Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
CitationJournal of Biological Chemistry 294: 770- 771 (2019)
AbstractThe basement membrane is a specialized sheet-like form of the extracellular matrix that provides structural support to epithelial cells and tissues, while influencing multiple biological functions, and was essential in the transition to multicellularity. By exploring a variety of genomes, Darris et al. provide evidence that the emergence and divergence of a multifunctional Goodpasture antigen-binding protein (GPBP), a basement membrane constituent, played a role in this transition. These findings help to explain how GPBP contributed to the formation of these extracellular matrices and to more precisely define the transition to multicellular organisms.
Publisher version (URL)http://dx.doi.org/10.1074/jbc.H118.006972
URIhttp://hdl.handle.net/10261/214762
Identifiersdoi: 10.1074/jbc.H118.006972
issn: 1083-351X
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