English   español  
Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10261/211633
Share/Impact:
Statistics
logo share SHARE logo core CORE   Add this article to your Mendeley library MendeleyBASE

Visualizar otros formatos: MARC | Dublin Core | RDF | ORE | MODS | METS | DIDL
Exportar a otros formatos:

Title

Ultraslow growth rates of giant gypsum crystals

AuthorsVan Driessche, Alexander E. S.; García Ruiz, Juan Manuel ; Tsukamoto, Katsuo; Patiño-López, L.D.; Satoh, H.
Issue Date2011
PublisherNational Academy of Sciences (U.S.)
CitationProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the USA 108: 15721-15726 (2011)
AbstractMineralogical processes taking place close to equilibrium, or with very slow kinetics, are difficult to quantify precisely. The determination of ultraslow dissolution/precipitation rates would reveal characteristic timing associated with these processes that are important at geological scale. We have designed an advanced high-resolution white-beam phase-shift interferometry microscope to measure growth rates of crystals at very low supersaturation values. To test this technique, we have selected the giant gypsum crystals of Naica ore mines in Chihuahua, Mexico, a challenging subject in mineral formation. They are thought to form by a self-feeding mechanism driven by solution-mediated anhydritegypsum phase transition, and therefore they must be the result of an extremely slow crystallization process close to equilibrium. To calculate the formation time of these crystals we have measured the growth rates of the {010} face of gypsum growing from current Naica waters at different temperatures. The slowest measurable growth rate was found at 55 degrees C, 1.4 +/- 0.2 x 10(-5) nm/s, the slowest directly measured normal growth rate for any crystal growth process. At higher temperatures, growth rates increase exponentially because of decreasing gypsum solubility and higher kinetic coefficient. At 50 degrees C neither growth nor dissolution was observed indicating that growth of giant crystals of gypsum occurred at Naica between 58 degrees C ( gypsum/anhydrite transition temperature) and the current temperature of Naica waters, confirming formation temperatures determined from fluid inclusion studies. Our results demonstrate the usefulness of applying advanced optical techniques in laboratory experiments to gain a better understanding of crystal growth processes occurring at a geological timescale.
Publisher version (URL)http://dx.doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1105233108
URIhttp://hdl.handle.net/10261/211633
Identifiersdoi: 10.1073/pnas.1105233108
issn: 0027-8424
Appears in Collections:(IACT) Artículos
Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat 
GarciaRuiz_PNAS.pdf2,25 MBAdobe PDFThumbnail
View/Open
Show full item record
Review this work
 

Related articles:


WARNING: Items in Digital.CSIC are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.