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Title

Neonicotinoids in excretion product of phloem-feeding insects kill beneficial insects

AuthorsCalvo-Agudo, Miguel; González-Cabrera, Joel; Picó, Yolanda; Calatayud-Vernich, Pau; Urbaneja, Alberto ; Dicke, Marcel; Tena, Alejandro
KeywordsEnvironmental risk assessment
Thiamethoxam
Honeydew
Pollinators
Biological control agents
Issue Date20-Aug-2019
PublisherNational Academy of Sciences (U.S.)
CitationProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 116(34): 16817-16822 (2019)
AbstractPest control in agriculture is mainly based on the application of insecticides, which may impact nontarget beneficial organisms leading to undesirable ecological effects. Neonicotinoids are among the most widely used insecticides. However, they have important negative side effects, especially for pollinators and other beneficial insects feeding on nectar. Here, we identify a more accessible exposure route: Neonicotinoids reach and kill beneficial insects that feed on the most abundant carbohydrate source for insects in agroecosystems, honeydew. Honeydew is the excretion product of phloem-feeding hemipteran insects such as aphids, mealybugs, whiteflies, and psyllids. We allowed parasitic wasps and pollinating hoverflies to feed on honeydew from hemipterans feeding on trees treated with thiamethoxam or imidacloprid, the most commonly used neonicotinoids. LC-MS/MS analyses demonstrated that both neonicotinoids were present in honeydew. Honeydew with thiamethoxam was highly toxic to both species of beneficial insects, and honeydew with imidacloprid was moderately toxic to hoverflies. Collectively, our data provide strong evidence for honeydew as a route of insecticide exposure that may cause acute or chronic deleterious effects on nontarget organisms. This route should be considered in future environmental risk assessments of neonicotinoid applications.
Publisher version (URL)http://dx.doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1904298116
URIhttp://hdl.handle.net/10261/208058
DOI10.1073/pnas.1904298116
Identifiersdoi: 10.1073/pnas.1904298116
e-issn: 1091-6490
issn: 0027-8424
Appears in Collections:(CIDE) Artículos
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