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Title

The origins and spread of Neolithic harvesting technologies from the Near East to Europe

AuthorsMazzucco, Niccolò ; Gibaja, Juan Francisco ; Ibáñez-Estévez, Juan José ; Masclans, Alba; Gassin, Bernard
KeywordsCereal harvesting
Neolithic farming
Near East to Europe
Food technology
Harvesting tools
Sickle inserts
Near-East
Mediterranean
Continental Europe
Tools morphology
Tools functionalit
Early Neolithic groups
Issue Date2019
PublisherCSIC - Institución Milá y Fontanals (IMF)
Citation1st Conference on the Early Neolithic of Europe, 6 to 8 November 2019, at Museu Marítim de Barcelona : 21 (2019)
AbstractCereal harvesting techniques are a fundamental part of the Neolithic farming package and a main technological innovation in food technology. The first harvesting tools were developed in the Near-East in the frame of Epipalaeolithic groups. During PPNA, PPNB and PN cultures harvesting tools strongly evolved, with both a regional and chronological variability. Starting from ca. the 7th millennium BCE, harvesting technologies were spread towards the Western Mediterranean and Central Europe. Analysing the technological and functional variability of the so-called sickle inserts at least three different ways of Neolithic expansion can be suggested: the Linearbandkeramik wave in Eastern and Central Europe, the maritime Impressed-Ware pioneer expansion, and a later Balkan-Mediterranean wave. In this presentation we will tackle this topic comprehensively, including new unpublished data from Near-East, Mediterranean and Continental Europe. Data collected from hundreds of sites will be here presented, focusing on the major changes occurred in harvesting tools morphology and functionality and their relationships with the cultural and technological dynamics of the Early Neolithic groups.
URIhttp://hdl.handle.net/10261/207665
Appears in Collections:(IMF) Comunicaciones congresos
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