English   español  
Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10261/199030
Share/Impact:
Statistics
logo share SHARE logo core CORE   Add this article to your Mendeley library MendeleyBASE

Visualizar otros formatos: MARC | Dublin Core | RDF | ORE | MODS | METS | DIDL
Exportar a otros formatos:

Title

Terrestrial reproduction as an adaptation to steep terrain in African toads

AuthorsLiedtke, H. Christoph; Müller, Hendrik; Hafner, Julian; Penner, Johannes; Gower, David J.; Mazuch, Tomas; Rödel, Mark-Oliver; Loader, Simon P.
Issue Date29-Mar-2017
PublisherRoyal Society (Great Britain)
CitationProceedings of the Royal Society of London - B 284(1851): (2017)
AbstractHow evolutionary novelties evolve is a major question in evolutionary biology. It is widely accepted that changes in environmental conditions shift the position of selective optima, and advancements in phylogenetic comparative approaches allow the rigorous testing of such correlated transitions. A longstanding question in vertebrate biology has been the evolution of terrestrial life histories in amphibians and here, by investigating African bufonids, we test whether terrestrial modes of reproduction have evolved as adaptations to particular abiotic habitat parameters. We reconstruct and date the most complete species-level molecular phylogeny and estimate ancestral states for reproductive modes. By correlating continuous habitat measurements from remote sensing data and locality records with life-history transitions, we discover that terrestrial modes of reproduction, including viviparity evolved multiple times in this group, most often directly from fully aquatic modes. Terrestrial modes of reproduction are strongly correlated with steep terrain and low availability of accumulated water sources. Evolutionary transitions to terrestrial modes of reproduction occurred synchronously with or after transitions in habitat, and we, therefore, interpret terrestrial breeding as an adaptation to these abiotic conditions, rather than an exaptation that facilitated the colonization of montane habitats.
Publisher version (URL)http://doi.org/10.1098/rspb.2016.2598
URIhttp://hdl.handle.net/10261/199030
Identifiersdoi: 10.1098/rspb.2016.2598
e-issn: 1471-2954
issn: 0962-8452
Appears in Collections:(EBD) Artículos
Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat 
accesoRestringido.pdf15,38 kBAdobe PDFThumbnail
View/Open
Show full item record
Review this work
 


WARNING: Items in Digital.CSIC are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.