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Title

Evaluation of Starch–Protein Interactions as a Function of pH

AuthorsBravo-Núñez, Ángela; Garzón, Raquel ; Rosell, Cristina M.; Gómez, Manuel
Issue Date7-May-2019
PublisherMultidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute
CitationFoods 8 (5): 155 (2019)
AbstractProtein–starch gels are becoming more common in food processing when looking for enriched foods. However, processing conditions scarcely are considered when producing those gels. The aim of this research was to study the effect of processing pH (4.5, 6.0, and 7.5) on the hydration and pasting properties, gel microstructure, and texture of corn starchy gels made with four different proteins (pea, rice, egg albumin, and whey) at a ratio of 1:1 starch/protein and a solid content of 12.28%. The water binding capacity of the starch–protein mixtures was positively influenced by low solubility of the protein used. Acidic pH decreased the apparent peak viscosity of both starch and starch–protein mixtures, with the exception of starch–albumin blends, which increased it. The gels’ microstructure showed that the uniformity of the protein-enriched gels was dependent on protein type and pH, leading to diverse hardness. In general, the starchy gels containing animal proteins (albumin and whey) were more affected by pH than those obtained with vegetal proteins (pea and rice). Therefore, processing pH might be an advisable method to modify the functionality of starch–protein gels.
URIhttp://hdl.handle.net/10261/182940
Identifiersdoi: 10.3390/foods8050155
Appears in Collections:Colección MDPI
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