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Title

Protein-Primed Replication of Bacteriophage ¿29 DNA

AuthorsSalas, Margarita ; Vega, Miguel de
Issue Date2016
CitationEnzymes 39: 137- 167 (2016)
AbstractThe requirement of DNA polymerases for a 30-hydroxyl (30-OH) group to prime DNA synthesis raised the question about how the ends of linear chromosomes could be replicated. Among the strategies that have evolved to handle the end replication problem, a group of linear phages and eukaryotic and archaeal viruses, among others, make use of a protein (terminal protein, TP) that primes DNA synthesis from the end of their genomes. The replicative DNA polymerase recognizes the OH group of a specific residue in the TP to initiate replication that is guided by an internal 30 nucleotide of the template strand. By a sliding-back mechanism or variants of it the terminal nucleotide(s) is(are) recovered and the TP becomes covalently attached to the genome ends. Bacillus subtilis phage ϕ29 is the organism in which such a mechanism has been studied more extensively, having allowed to lay the foundations of the so-called protein-primed replication mechanism. Here we focus on the main biochemical and structural features of the two main proteins responsible for the protein-primed initiation step: the DNA polymerase and the TP. Thus, we will discuss the structural determinants of the DNA polymerase responsible for its ability to use sequentially a TP and a DNA as primers, as well as for its inherent capacity to couple high processive synthesis to strand displacement. On the other hand, we will review how TP primes initiation followed by a transition step for further DNA-primed replication by the same polymerase molecule. Finally, we will review how replication is compartmentalized in vivo
URIhttp://hdl.handle.net/10261/182857
Identifiersdoi: 10.1016/bs.enz.2016.03.005
issn: 1874-6047
Appears in Collections:(CBM) Libros y Partes de Libros
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