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Title

Nitro-oxidative metabolism during fruit ripening

AuthorsCorpas, Francisco J. CSIC ORCID; Freschi, Luciano; Rodríguez-Ruiz, Marta CSIC ORCID; Mioto, P.T.; González-Gordo, Salvador CSIC ORCID; Palma Martínez, José Manuel CSIC ORCID
Keywordsnitric oxide
tomato
pepper
reactive oxygen and nitrogen species
Fruit ripening
nitro-oxidative stress
Issue Date2018
PublisherOxford University Press
CitationJournal of Experimental Botany 69: 3449- 3463 (2018)
AbstractPepper (Capsicum annuum L.) and tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.), which belong to the Solanaceae family, are among the most cultivated and consumed fleshy fruits worldwide and constitute excellent sources of many essential nutrients, such as vitamins A, C, and E, calcium, and carotenoids. While fruit ripening is a highly regulated and complex process, tomato and pepper have been classified as climacteric and non-climacteric fruits, respectively. These fruits differ greatly in shape, color composition, flavor, and several other features which undergo drastic changes during the ripening process. Such ripening-related metabolic and developmental changes require extensive alterations in many cellular and biochemical processes, which ultimately leads to fully ripe fruits with nutritional and organoleptic features that are attractive to both natural dispersers and human consumers. Recent data show that reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS/RNS) are involved in fruit ripening, during which molecules, such as hydrogen peroxide (HO), NADPH, nitric oxide (NO), peroxynitrite (ONOO -), and S-nitrosothiols (SNOs), interact to regulate protein functions through post-translational modifications. In light of these recent discoveries, this review provides an update on the nitro-oxidative metabolism during the ripening of two of the most economically important fruits, discusses the signaling roles played by ROS/RNS in controlling this complex physiological process, and highlights the potential biotechnological applications of these substances to promote further improvements in fruit ripening regulation and nutritional quality. In addition, we suggest that the term € nitro-oxidative eustress' with regard to fruit ripening would be more appropriate than nitro-oxidative stress, which ultimately favors the consolidation of the plant species.
URIhttp://hdl.handle.net/10261/180287
DOI10.1093/jxb/erx453
Identifiersdoi: 10.1093/jxb/erx453
issn: 1460-2431
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