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Title

Surviving at high elevations: an inter- and intra-specific analysis in a mountain bird community

AuthorsBastianelli, Giula; Tavecchia, G.; Meléndez, L.; Seoane Pinilla, Javier; Obeso Suárez, José Ramón; Laiolo, Paola CSIC ORCID
KeywordsAdult survival
Elevation
Inter-specific variation
Capture–recapture analyses
Passerines
Issue Date20-Mar-2017
PublisherSpringer
CitationOecologia 184(2): 293-303 (2017)
AbstractElevation represents an important selection agent on self-maintenance traits and correlated life histories in birds, but no study has analysed whether life-history variation along this environmental cline is consistent among and within species. In a sympatric community of passerines, we analysed how the average adult survival of 25 open-habitat species varied with their elevational distribution and how adult survival varied with elevation at the intra-specific level. For such purpose, we estimated intra-specific variation in adult survival in two mountainous species, the Water pipit (Anthus spinoletta) and the Northern wheatear (Oenanthe oenanthe) in NW Spain, by means of capture–recapture analyses. At the inter-specific level, high-elevation species showed higher survival values than low elevation ones, likely because a greater allocation to self-maintenance permits species to persist in alpine environments. At the intra-specific level, the magnitude of survival variation was lower by far. Nevertheless, Water pipit survival slightly decreased at high elevations, while the proportion of transient birds increased. In contrast, no such relationships were found in the Northern wheatear. Intra-specific analyses suggest that living at high elevation may be costly, such as for the Water pipit in our case study. Therefore, it seems that a species can persist with viable populations in uplands, where extrinsic mortality is high, by increasing the investment in self-maintenance and prospecting behaviours.
Publisher version (URL)https://doi.org/10.1007/s00442-017-3852-1
URIhttp://hdl.handle.net/10261/175180
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00442-017-3852-1
ISSN0029-8549
E-ISSN1432-1939
Appears in Collections:(INCAR) Artículos
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