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Title

Age-dependent changes in essential elements and oxidative stress biomarkers in blood of red deer and vulnerability to nutritional deficiencies

AuthorsPareja-Carrera, Jennifer; Rodríguez-Estival, Jaime ; Martínez-Haro, Mónica ; Ortiz, José-Antonio; Mateo, Rafael
KeywordsWhite-muscle disease
Ruminants
Enzootic ataxia
Antioxidants
Trace metals
Issue Date2018
PublisherElsevier
CitationScience of the Total Environment 626: 340-348 (2018)
AbstractChanges in the concentration of circulating essential elements in animals over life may be indicative of periods of vulnerability to deficiencies and associated diseases. Here we studied age-related variations in essential elements (Se, Cu, Zn and Mn) and some selected oxidative stress biomarkers (GPx, SOD, vitamin A and vitamin E) in blood of an Iberian red deer (Cervus elaphus hispanicus) population living in semicaptive conditions. Animals during their first year of life showed to be especially vulnerable to suffer Se- and Cu-related diseases and disorders. Older female deer had lower blood levels of Zn and Mn, which was accompanied by a lower blood SOD activity. On the contrary, GPx blood activity was elevated in older deer, which may help to compensate the reduction of other antioxidants with during aging. Age-related changes in GPx and SOD and their positive relationships with the essential elements suggest that the observed nutritional deficiencies at certain age stages may have a detrimental effect on the antioxidant system, increasing the risk of oxidative stress. Thus, the biomarkers used in the present study may be important tools for the subclinical diagnosis of nutritional disorders and diseases related to the generation of oxidative stress in both domestic and wild ungulates.
URIhttp://hdl.handle.net/10261/174464
Identifiersdoi: 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2018.01.072
e-issn: 1879-1026
issn: 0048-9697
Appears in Collections:(IREC) Artículos
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