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Title

Ready-to-eat cereals improve nutrient, milk and fruit intake at breakfast in European adolescents

AuthorsMichels, Nathalie; De Henauw, Stefaan; Béghin, Laurent; Cuenca-García, Magdalena; González Gross, Marcela; Hallström, Lena; Kafatos, Anthony; Kersting, Mathilde; Manios, Yannis; Marcos, Ascensión ; Molnar, Denes; Roccaldo, Romana; Sjöström, Michael; Reye, Béatrice; Thielecke, Frank; Widhalm, Kurt; Claessens, Mandy
KeywordsFruit
Milk
Nutrients
Breakfast
Adolescents
Ready-to-eat cereals
Issue Date2016
PublisherSpringer Nature
CitationEuropean Journal of Nutrition 55(2): 771-779 (2016)
Abstract[Purpose]: Breakfast consumption has been recommended as part of a healthy diet. Recently, ready-to-eat cereals (RTEC) became more popular as a breakfast item. Our aim was to analyse the dietary characteristics of an RTEC breakfast in European adolescents and to compare them with other breakfast options. [Methods]: From the European multi-centre HELENA study, two 24-h dietary recalls of 3137 adolescents were available. Food items (RTEC or bread, milk/yoghurt, fruit) and macro- and micronutrient intakes at breakfast were calculated. Cross-sectional regression analyses were adjusted for gender, age, socio-economic status and city. [Results]: Compared to bread breakfasts (39 %) and all other breakfasts (41.5 %), RTEC breakfast (19.5 %) was associated with improved nutrient intake (less fat and less sucrose; more fibre, protein and some micronutrients like vitamin B, calcium, magnesium and phosphorus) at the breakfast occasion. Exceptions were more simple sugars in RTEC breakfast consumers: more lactose and galactose due to increased milk consumption, but also higher glucose and fructose than bread consumers. RTEC consumers had a significantly higher frequency (92.5 vs. 50.4 and 60.2 %) and quantity of milk/yoghurt intake and a slightly higher frequency of fruit intake (13.4 vs. 10.9 and 8.0 %) at breakfast. [Conclusions]: Among European adolescents, RTEC consumers showed a more favourable nutrient intake than consumers of bread or other breakfasts, except for simple sugars. Therefore, RTEC may be regarded as a good breakfast option as part of a varied and balanced diet. Nevertheless, more research is warranted concerning the role of different RTEC types in nutrient intake, especially for simple sugars.
URIhttp://hdl.handle.net/10261/171609
DOI10.1007/s00394-015-0898-x
Identifiersdoi: 10.1007/s00394-015-0898-x
e-issn: 1436-6215
issn: 1436-6207
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