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Title

Association between dietary inflammatory index and inflammatory markers in the HELENA study

AuthorsShivappa, Nitin; Hebert, James R.; Marcos, Ascensión CSIC; Díaz, L. E. CSIC; Gómez Martínez, Sonia CSIC ORCID; Nova, Esther CSIC ORCID ; Michels, Nathalie; Arouca, Aline; González-Gil, Esther; Frederic, Gottrand; González Gross, Marcela; Castillo, Manuel J.; Manios, Yannis; Kersting, Mathilde; Gunter, Marc J.; De Henauw, Stefaan; Kafatos, Anthony; Widhalm, Kurt; Molnár, Dénes; Moreno, Luis A.; Huybrechts, Inge
KeywordsInflammation
Diet
Cross-sectional
HELENA
Adolescents
Issue Date2017
PublisherWiley-VCH
CitationMolecular Nutrition and Food Research 61(6): 1600707 (2017)
Abstract[Background]: Previous research has shown that diet is associated with low-grade systemic inflammation among adults. However, no study has yet been conducted to explore the association between inflammatory potential of diet and low-grade systemic inflammation among adolescents whose dietary behavior may be different from adults. [Methods and Results]: We examine the predictive ability of 24-h recall-derived dietary inflammatory index (DII) scores on inflammation among 532 European adolescents in the HELENA cross-sectional study. The DII is a literature-derived dietary index developed to predict inflammation. The DII was calculated per 1000 calories and was tested against C-reactive protein, ILs-1,2,4,10, TNF-α, ICAM, vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM), and IFN-γ. All inflammatory markers had nonnormal distributions and therefore were log transformed. Analyses were performed using multivariable linear regression, adjusting for age, sex, city, BMI, smoking, and physical activity. Pro-inflammatory diet (higher DII scores) was associated with increased levels of various inflammatory markers: TNF-α, IL-1, 2, IFN-γ, and vascular cell adhesion molecule (b = 0.13, 95% CI: 0.001, 0.25; 0.13, 95% CI 0.001, 0.25; 0.40, 95% CI: 0.03, 0.77; 0.53, 95% CI: 0.05, 1.01; 0.07, 95% CI: 0.01, 0.13, respectively). [Conclusion]: These results reinforce the fact that diet, as a whole, plays an important role in modifying inflammation in adolescents.
DescriptionOn behalf of the HELENA study group.
URIhttp://hdl.handle.net/10261/171195
DOI10.1002/mnfr.201600707
Identifiersdoi: 10.1002/mnfr.201600707
e-issn: 1613-4133
issn: 1613-4125
Appears in Collections:(ICTAN) Artículos




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