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Title

Evolution of protein ductility in duplicated genes of plants

AuthorsYruela Guerrero, Inmaculada ; Contreras-Moreira, Bruno ; Dunker, A. Keith; Niklas, Karl J.
KeywordsIDPs
polyploidy
protein ductility
protein disorder
paralogs
genome duplication
plants
Issue DateAug-2018
PublisherFrontiers Media
CitationYruela I, Contreras-Moreira B, Dunker AK, Niklas KJ. Evolution of protein ductility in duplicated genes of plants. Frontiers in Plant Science 9: Article 1216 (2018)
AbstractPrevious work has shown that ductile/intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) and residues (IDRs) are found in all unicellular and multicellular organisms, wherein they are essential for basic cellular functions and complement the function of rigid proteins. In addition, computational studies of diverse phylogenetic lineages have revealed: (1) that protein ductility increases in concert with organismic complexity, and (2) that distributions of IDPs and IDRs along the chromosomes of plant species are non-random and correlate with variations in the rates of the genetic recombination and chromosomal rearrangement. Here, we show that approximately 50% of aligned residues in paralogs across a spectrum of algae, bryophytes, monocots, and eudicots are IDRs and that a high proportion (ca. 60%) are in disordered segments greater than 30 residues. When three types of IDRs are distinguished (i.e., identical, similar and variable IDRs) we find that species with large numbers of chromosome and endoduplicated genes exhibit paralogous sequences with a higher frequency of identical IDRs, whereas species with small chromosomes numbers exhibit paralogous sequences with a higher frequency of similar and variable IDRs. These results are interpreted to indicate that genome duplication events influence the distribution of IDRs along protein sequences and likely favor the presence of identical IDRs (compared to similar IDRs or variable IDRs). We discuss the evolutionary implications of gene duplication events in the context of ductile/disordered residues and segments, their conservation, and their effects on functionality.
Description10 Pags.- 1 Tabl.- 5 Figs. The Supplementary Material for this article can be found online at: https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fpls.2018.01216/ full#supplementary-material. Copyright © 2018 Yruela, Contreras-Moreira, Dunker and Niklas. This is an openaccess article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). The use, distribution or reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original author(s) and the copyright owner(s) are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms.
Publisher version (URL)https://doi.org/10.3389/fpls.2018.01216
URIhttp://hdl.handle.net/10261/169172
DOI10.3389/fpls.2018.01216
ISSN1664-462X
Appears in Collections:(EEAD) Artículos
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