Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10261/16344
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dc.contributor.authorCarrasco Blázquez, Lucía-
dc.contributor.authorCaravaca Ballester, María Fuensanta-
dc.contributor.authorÁlvarez-Rogel, José-
dc.contributor.authorRoldán Garrigos, Antonio-
dc.date.accessioned2009-08-27T11:31:05Z-
dc.date.available2009-08-27T11:31:05Z-
dc.date.issued2006-06-
dc.identifier.citationChemosphere 64(1): 104-111 (2006)en_US
dc.identifier.issn0045-6535-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10261/16344-
dc.description8 pages, 6 tables.en_US
dc.description.abstractWe investigated the relationship of the zonal pattern followed by the vegetation in a polluted Mediterranean salt marsh, in semiarid south-eastern Spain, with the microbiological and biochemical properties (labile C fractions, oxidoreductases and hydrolases) of the rhizosphere soil of two halophyte species, Arthrocnemum macrostachyum and Sarcocornia fruticosa, and with the degree of arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) colonisation in their rhizospheres. Levels of plant biomass and cover were inversely related to heavy metal contents and salinity. The concentrations of Fe, Cu, Mn and Pb extracted with DTPA hardly varied among the different zones of the salt marsh. The dehydrogenase and phosphatase activities, the soluble C and water-soluble carbohydrates concentrations and the extent of root colonisation were greater in the salt marsh zones of lower soil salinity and lower metal concentration. Urease and β-glucosidase activities were not detected in the salt marsh. Plant biomass and cover showed positive relationships with mycorrhizal colonisation (R = 0.773, P < 0.001; R = 0.874, P < 0.001, respectively). Mycorrhizal colonisation was negatively correlated with the contents of Pb and Zn in plant tissues. This work supports the view that reduced plant uptake of toxic metals, particularly lead, could be involved in the beneficial effects of AM fungi on plant development in Mediterranean salt marshes contaminated with mining wastes.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipThis research was supported by CICYT (Project AGL2003-05619-CO2-01).en_US
dc.format.extent259768 bytes-
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf-
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherElsevieren_US
dc.rightsclosedAccessen_US
dc.subjectEnzyme activitiesen_US
dc.subjectHeavy metalen_US
dc.subjectArbuscular mycorrhizal fungien_US
dc.subjectMining wasteen_US
dc.subjectSalt marshen_US
dc.titleMicrobial processes in the rhizosphere soil of a heavy metals-contaminated Mediterranean salt marsh: A facilitating role of AM fungien_US
dc.typeartículoen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.chemosphere.2005.11.038-
dc.description.peerreviewedPeer revieweden_US
dc.relation.publisherversionhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.chemosphere.2005.11.038en_US
dc.contributor.funderComisión Interministerial de Ciencia y Tecnología, CICYT (España)-
dc.identifier.funderhttp://dx.doi.org/10.13039/501100007273es_ES
dc.type.coarhttp://purl.org/coar/resource_type/c_6501es_ES
item.grantfulltextnone-
item.openairecristypehttp://purl.org/coar/resource_type/c_18cf-
item.cerifentitytypePublications-
item.fulltextNo Fulltext-
item.languageiso639-1en-
item.openairetypeartículo-
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