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dc.contributor.authorGarcía-Granero Fos, Juan Josées_ES
dc.contributor.authorGadekar, C.S.es_ES
dc.contributor.authorEsteban, Irenees_ES
dc.contributor.authorLancelotti, Carlaes_ES
dc.contributor.authorMadella, Marcoes_ES
dc.contributor.authorAjithprasad, P.es_ES
dc.date.accessioned2018-03-13T11:54:06Z-
dc.date.available2018-03-13T11:54:06Z-
dc.date.issued2017-
dc.identifier.citationArchaeological and Anthropological Sciences (9/2) : 251–263 (2017)es_ES
dc.identifier.issn1866-9557-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10261/162135-
dc.description.abstractThe exploitation of lithic resources was an important aspect of prehistoric resource exploitation strategies and adaptation. Research has mostly focused on technological and spatial aspects of lithic factory sites, often overlooking how these sites were integrated within local socioecological dynamics in terms of food acquisition and consumption. The aim of this paper is to study plant consumption at Datrana, a 5000-year-old lithic blade workshop in North Gujarat, India, in order to understand its occupants’ subsistence strategies. The results of archaeobotanical, mineralogical and soil pH analyses show that the occupants of this factory site were consuming local crops but not processing them, suggesting that either (a) food was being processed in other areas of the site or (b) it was acquired in a ‘ready-to-consume’ state from local food-producing communities. This study highlights the integration of a lithic factory site within its surrounding cultural and natural landscape, offering an example of how the inhabitants of a workshop interacted with local communities to acquire food resources.es_ES
dc.language.isoenges_ES
dc.publisherSpringeres_ES
dc.rightsclosedAccesses_ES
dc.subjectLithic workshopes_ES
dc.subjectCraft specialisationes_ES
dc.subjectArchaeobotanyes_ES
dc.subjectMineralogyes_ES
dc.subjectSubsistence strategieses_ES
dc.subjectSouth Asiaes_ES
dc.titleWhat is on the craftsmen’s menu? Plant consumption at Datrana, a 5000-year-old lithic blade workshop in North Gujarat, Indiaes_ES
dc.typeartículoes_ES
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s12520-015-0281-0-
dc.description.peerreviewedPeer reviewedes_ES
dc.relation.publisherversionhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12520-015-0281-0es_ES
dc.relation.publisherversionhttps://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s12520-015-0281-0es_ES
dc.relation.publisherversionhttps://link.springer.com/content/pdf/10.1007%2Fs12520-015-0281-0.pdfes_ES
dc.identifier.e-issn1866-9565-
dc.relation.csices_ES
oprm.item.hasRevisionno ko 0 false*
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