Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10261/153045
Share/Export:
logo share SHARE logo core CORE BASE
Visualizar otros formatos: MARC | Dublin Core | RDF | ORE | MODS | METS | DIDL | DATACITE
Title

Target and Non-target Site Mechanisms Developed by Glyphosate-Resistant Hairy beggarticks (Bidens pilosa L.) Populations from Mexico

AuthorsAlcántara de la Cruz, Ricardo; Fernández-Moreno, Pablo T.; Ozuna, Carmen CSIC ORCID; Rojano-Delgado, Antonia María; Cruz-Hipólito, Hugo Enrique; Domínguez Valenzuela, José A.; Barro Losada, Francisco CSIC ORCID ; Prado, R. del
Issue Date3-Oct-2016
PublisherFrontiers Media
CitationFrontiers in Plant Science 7: 1492 (2016)
AbstractIn 2014 hairy beggarticks (Bidens pilosa L.) has been identified as being glyphosate-resistant in citrus orchards from Mexico. The target and non-target site mechanisms involved in the response to glyphosate of two resistant populations (R1 and R2) and one susceptible (S) were studied. Experiments of dose-response, shikimic acid accumulation, uptake-translocation, enzyme activity and 5-enolpyruvyl shikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS) gene sequencing were carried out in each population. The R1 and R2 populations were 20.4 and 2.8-fold less glyphosate sensitive, respectively, than the S population. The resistant populations showed a lesser shikimic acid accumulation than the S population. In the latter one, 24.9% of 14C-glyphosate was translocated to the roots at 96 h after treatment; in the R1 and R2 populations only 12.9 and 15.5%, respectively, was translocated. Qualitative results confirmed the reduced 14C-glyphosate translocation in the resistant populations. The EPSPS enzyme activity of the S population was 128.4 and 8.5-fold higher than the R1 and R2 populations of glyphosate-treated plants, respectively. A single (Pro-106-Ser), and a double (Thr-102-Ile followed by Pro-106-Ser) mutations were identified in the EPSPS2 gene conferred high resistance in R1 population. Target-site mutations associated with a reduced translocation were responsible for the higher glyphosate resistance in the R1 population. The low-intermediate resistance of the R2 population was mediated by reduced translocation. This is the first glyphosate resistance case confirmed in hairy beggarticks in the world.
Publisher version (URL)http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fpls.2016.01492
URIhttp://hdl.handle.net/10261/153045
DOI10.3389/fpls.2016.01492
ISSN1664-462X
Appears in Collections:(IAS) Artículos

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat
Target and Non-target Site Mechanisms Developed.pdf1,86 MBAdobe PDFThumbnail
View/Open
Show full item record
Review this work

PubMed Central
Citations

20
checked on May 20, 2022

SCOPUSTM   
Citations

53
checked on May 19, 2022

WEB OF SCIENCETM
Citations

32
checked on May 20, 2022

Page view(s)

269
checked on May 22, 2022

Download(s)

163
checked on May 22, 2022

Google ScholarTM

Check

Altmetric

Dimensions


Related articles:


WARNING: Items in Digital.CSIC are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.