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Extraction and characterization of bioactive compounds with health benefits from marine resources: Macro and micro algae, cyanobacteria, and invertebrates

AutorIbáñez, Elena ; Herrero, Miguel ; Mendiola, J. A. ; Castro-Puyana, M.
Fecha de publicación2012
EditorSpringer
CitaciónMarine Bioactive Compounds: Sources, Characterization and Applications (Chap.2): 55-98 (2012)
ResumenThe occurrence and incidence of different diseases such as cancer, cardiovascular diseases, obesity, and diabetes may be related to the consumption of high calorie calorie-containing diets combined with sedentary lifestyles. The concept of functional foods first appeared in Japan where it was considered to be a tool to promote health and well-being. In 1992, the Japanese government established a policy of “Foods of Specific Health Uses” (FOSHU). This concept was further developed in Europe within the “Functional Food Science in Europe” (FUFOSE) project supported by the European Commission (EC) and co-ordinated by the International Life Sciences Institute (ILSI). Several interesting points were observed at the end of this project (Bellisle, F., A.T. Diplock, G. Hornstra, B. Koletzko, M. Roberfroid, S. Salminen, et al. 1998. Functional food science in Europe. British Journal of Nutrition 80:1–193; Diplock, A.T., P.J. Agget, M. Ashwell, F. Bornet, E.B. Fern, M.B. Roberfroid. 1999. Scientific concepts of functional foods in Europe: Consensus document. British Journal of Nutrition 81:S1–S27), including a definition of a functional food as “a food which is demonstrated to positively affect one or more physiological functions, so that it is able to increase the well-being and/or to reduce the risk to suffer a disease” (Diplock, A.T., P.J. Agget, M. Ashwell, F. Bornet, E.B. Fern, M.B. Roberfroid. 1999. Scientific concepts of functional foods in Europe: Consensus document. British Journal of Nutrition 81:S1–S27). This definition implies that a functional food must maintain the shape of the food (thereby excluding pills and capsules) and that the functional food must impart a physiological effect following consumption that is above and beyond any observed nutritional effects.
URIhttp://hdl.handle.net/10261/151817
DOI10.1007/978-1-4614-1247-2_2
Identificadoresdoi: 10.1007/978-1-4614-1247-2_2
isbn: 978-146141247-2
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