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Title

RNA interference in ticks

AuthorsKocan, Katherine M.; Blouin, Edmour F.; Fuente, José de la
KeywordsTicks
Tick-borne pathogens
Genetics
Infectious Disease
Funtional genomics
Gene expression
RNA interference
Issue 47
Issue Date2011
PublisherJournal of Visualized Experiments
CitationJournal of Visualized Experiments (47): e2474 (2011)
AbstractTicks are obligate hematophagous ectoparasites of wild and domestic animals and humans, and are considered to be second worldwide to mosquitoes as vectors of human diseases and the most important vectors affecting cattle industry worldwide. Ticks are classified in the subclass Acari, order Parasitiformes, suborder Ixodida and are distributed worldwide from Arctic to tropical regions. Despite efforts to control tick infestations, these ectoparasites remain a serious problem for human and animal health. RNA interference (RNAi) is a nucleic acid-based reverse genetic approach that involves disruption of gene expression in order to determine gene function or its effect on a metabolic pathway. Small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) are the effector molecules of the RNAi pathway that is initiated by double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) and results in a potent sequence-specific degradation of cytoplasmic mRNAs containing the same sequence as the dsRNA trigger. Post-transcriptional gene silencing mechanisms initiated by dsRNA have been discovered in all eukaryotes studied thus far, and RNAi has been rapidly developed in a variety of organisms as a tool for functional genomics studies and other applications. RNAi has become the most widely used gene-silencing technique in ticks and other organisms where alternative approaches for genetic manipulation are not available or are unreliable. The genetic characterization of ticks has been limited until the recent application of RNAi. In the short time that RNAi has been available, it has proved to be a valuable tool for studying tick gene function, the characterization of the tick-pathogen interface and the screening and characterization of tick protective antigens. Herein, a method for RNAi through injection of dsRNA into unfed ticks is described. It is likely that the knowledge gained from this experimental approach will contribute markedly to the understanding of basic biological systems and the development of vaccines to control tick infestations and prevent transmission of tick-borne pathogens.
DescriptionVideo Article: http://www.jove.com/video/2474
Publisher version (URL)https://doi.org/10.3791/2474
URIhttp://hdl.handle.net/10261/143946
DOI10.3791/2474
Identifiersdoi: 10.3791/2474
e-issn: 1940-087X
Appears in Collections:(IREC) Artículos
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