English   español  
Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10261/142276
Share/Impact:
Statistics
logo share SHARE logo core CORE   Add this article to your Mendeley library MendeleyBASE

Visualizar otros formatos: MARC | Dublin Core | RDF | ORE | MODS | METS | DIDL
Exportar a otros formatos:

Title

The impact of climate trends on a tick affecting public health: a retrospective modeling approach for Hyalomma marginatum (Ixodidae)

AuthorsEstrada-Peña, Agustín; Fuente, José de la ; Latapia, Tamara; Ortega, Carmelo
Issue Date8-May-2015
PublisherPublic Library of Science
CitationPLoS ONE 10(5): e0125760 (2015)
AbstractThe impact of climate trends during the period 1901-2009 on the life cycle of Hyalomma marginatum in Europe was modeled to assess changes in the physiological processes of this threat to public health. Monthly records of temperature and water vapour at a resolution of 0.5° and equations describing the life cycle processes of the tick were used. The climate in the target region affected the rates of the life cycle processes of H. marginatum: development rates increased, mortality rates in molting stages decreased, and the survival rates of questing ticks decreased in wide territories of the Mediterranean basin. The modeling framework indicated the existence of critical areas in the Balkans, central Europe, and the western coast of France, where the physiological processes of the tick improved to extents that are consistent with the persistence of populations if introduced. A spatially explicit risk assessment was performed to detect candidate areas where active surveys should be performed to monitor changes in tick density or persistence after a hypothetical introduction. We detected areas where the critical abiotic (climate) and biotic (host density) factors overlap, including most of the Iberian peninsula, the Mediterranean coast of France, eastern Turkey, and portions of the western Black Sea region. Wild ungulate densities are unavailable for large regions of the territory, a factor that might affect the outcome of the study. The risk of successfully establishing H. marginatum populations at northern latitudes of its current colonization range seems to be still low, even if the climate has improved the performance of the tick in these areas.
Publisher version (URL)http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0125760
URIhttp://hdl.handle.net/10261/142276
DOI10.1371/journal.pone.0125760
Identifierse-issn: 1932-6203
Appears in Collections:(IREC) Artículos
Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat 
ModelingHyalomma.PDF1,83 MBAdobe PDFThumbnail
View/Open
Show full item record
Review this work
 

Related articles:


WARNING: Items in Digital.CSIC are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.