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Title

Correlates of reproductive success in male lizards of the alpine species Iberolacerta cyreni

AuthorsSalvador Milla, Alfredo ; Díaz, José A.; Veiga, José Pablo ; Bloor, P.; Brown, Richard P.
KeywordsActivity
Lizard
Microsatellites
Polygamy
Reproductive costs
Reproductive success
Survivorship
Issue DateJan-2008
PublisherOxford University Press
CitationBehavioral Ecology 19(1): 169-176 (2008)
AbstractWe followed a field population of the alpine lizard Iberolacerta cyreni over 2 consecutive breeding seasons and assigned paternity to the offpring using 8 microsatellite markers. Paternity data, combined with observations of the behavior, morphology, and spacing patterns of lizards, allowed us to document the extent of polygamy, the phenotypic correlates of the number of offspring sired, and the correlation between male reproductive success (RS) and probability of recapture the second year of our study. Multiple paternity was observed in nearly 50% of clutches, and the mating system was highly polygynandrous. In the first year of our study, male RS increased with body size, activity, tail length, and color saturation of the dorsum. In the second year, male RS increased with activity and body condition. Overall, increased male activity, a trait that is expected to decrease survivorship, was the explanatory variable that had the greatest effect on RS. However, the residents of our first study year that were recaptured in the second year had longer tails, were more active, and sired more offspring than their conspecifics that were not recaptured. Thus, contrary to expectations, no negative correlation between present reproduction and future survival was found, which suggests that male investment in reproduction is condition dependent and positively correlated with the ability to pay the underlying costs of increased activity.
Publisher version (URL)http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/beheco/arm118
URIhttp://hdl.handle.net/10261/140814
DOI10.1093/beheco/arm118
ISSN1045-2249
E-ISSN1465-7279
Appears in Collections:(MNCN) Artículos
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