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dc.contributor.authorStarr, Richard M.es_ES
dc.contributor.authorSala, Enrices_ES
dc.contributor.authorBallesteros, Enrices_ES
dc.contributor.authorZabala, Mikeles_ES
dc.date.accessioned2016-05-09T10:30:38Z-
dc.date.available2016-05-09T10:30:38Z-
dc.date.issued2007-
dc.identifier.citationMarine Ecology Progress Series 343: 239-249 (2007)es_ES
dc.identifier.issn0171-8630-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10261/131877-
dc.description11 páginas, 5 figuras, 1 tabla.es_ES
dc.description.abstractWorldwide, chronic overfishing has depleted populations of large predatory reef fishes and caused unexpected, top-down changes in coral reef ecosystems. Groupers are especially susceptible to overexploitation, because they aggregate to reproduce at specific locations and times. An understanding of the spatial dynamics of these fishes is critical for fisheries management and conservation. However, movements and migration dynamics of endangered reef fishes are poorly known. We show, using acoustic telemetry, that Nassau groupers Epinephelus striatus exhibit highly synchronised migration to spawning sites, despite their otherwise solitary habits. Reproductive adults leave their individual territories in shallow waters near the winter full moons, and migrate to the same spawning site up to 4 times yr–1. At the spawning site, a remarkable population-wide depth change occurs within an hour as individuals dive to a maximum depth of 255 m. Our results greatly expand the previously known migration frequency and depth range of this species, and reveal an unexpected yet predictable complexity of adult fish migration between habitats. Effective conservation of this threatened species requires that deeper reefs and the timing of migration events be incorporated into fisheries management plans.es_ES
dc.description.sponsorshipThis research was supported by the Wildlife Conservation Society and the University of California Sea Grant Extension Program.es_ES
dc.language.isoenges_ES
dc.publisherInter Researches_ES
dc.relation.isversionofPublisher's versiones_ES
dc.rightsopenAccesses_ES
dc.subjectNassau grouperes_ES
dc.subjectSite fidelityes_ES
dc.subjectSwimming speedes_ES
dc.subjectMigrationes_ES
dc.subjectAcoustic telemetryes_ES
dc.subjectGrouper conservationes_ES
dc.titleSpatial dynamics of the Nassau grouper Epinephelus striatus in a Caribbean atolles_ES
dc.typeartículoes_ES
dc.identifier.doi10.3354/meps06897-
dc.description.peerreviewedPeer reviewedes_ES
dc.relation.publisherversionhttp://dx.doi.org/10.3354/meps06897es_ES
dc.identifier.e-issn1616-1599-
dc.relation.csices_ES
oprm.item.hasRevisionno ko 0 false*
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