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dc.contributor.authorLópez-Legentil, S.es_ES
dc.contributor.authorTuron, Xavieres_ES
dc.contributor.authorErwin, Patrick M.es_ES
dc.date.accessioned2016-01-15T07:55:34Z-
dc.date.available2016-01-15T07:55:34Z-
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.identifier.citationFrontiers in Zoology 13 : 2 DOI 10.1186/s12983-016-0134-4 (2016)es_ES
dc.identifier.issn1742-9994-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10261/127628-
dc.description11 páginas, 2 tablas, 7 figurases_ES
dc.description.abstractBackground: Ascidians can associate with abundant and diverse consortia ofmicrobial symbionts, yet these communities remain unexamined for the majority of host ascidians and little is known about host-symbiont interactions. Methods: We coupled electron microscopy and 16S rRNA gene tag pyrosequencing to investigate the bacterial communities associated with the colonial ascidian Pseudodistoma crucigaster, a species endemic to theMediterranean Sea that has a life cycle with two phases: actively-filtering (active) and non-filtering (resting) forms. Results: Resting colonies exhibited a reduced branchial sac (feeding apparatus) and a thickened cuticle. Electron microscope images also suggested higher abundance of colonizing microorganisms on surfaces of resting colonies. Accordingly, bacterial sequences associated with environmental sources (sediment and biofilms, >99 % similarity) were detected exclusively in resting colonies. Bacterial communities of P. crucigaster colonies (active and resting) were dominated by 3 core taxa affiliated (>94 % similarity) with previously described symbiotic Alphaproteobacteria in marine invertebrates. Shifts in rare bacteria were detected when ascidians entered the resting phase, including the appearance of strictly anaerobic lineages and nitrifying bacterial guilds. Conclusions: These findings suggest that physical (thickened cuticle) and metabolic (feeding cessation) changes in host ascidians have cascading effects on associated bacteria, where modified oxygen concentrations and chemical substrates for microbial metabolism may create anaerobic microhabitats and promote colonization by environmental microorganisms.es_ES
dc.description.sponsorshipThis research was funded by the Marie Curie International Reintegration Grant FP7-PEOPLE-2010-RG 277038 within the 7th European Community Framework Program, the Spanish Government projects MARSYMBIOMICS CTM2013-43287-P and CHALLENGEN CTM2013-48163, and the Catalan Government grant 2014SGR-336 for Consolidated Research Groups.es_ES
dc.language.isoenges_ES
dc.publisherBioMed Centrales_ES
dc.relation.isversionofPublisher's versiones_ES
dc.rightsopenAccesses_ES
dc.subjectTEMes_ES
dc.subjectSEMes_ES
dc.subjectTunicatees_ES
dc.subjectBacterial diversityes_ES
dc.subjectSymbiosises_ES
dc.subjectFilter-feedinges_ES
dc.subjectMediterranean seaes_ES
dc.subjectNext-generation sequencinges_ES
dc.subject16S rRNAes_ES
dc.titleFeeding cessation alters host morphology and bacterial communities in the ascidian Pseudodistoma crucigasteres_ES
dc.typeartículoes_ES
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/s12983-016-0134-4-
dc.description.peerreviewedPeer reviewedes_ES
dc.relation.publisherversionhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12983-016-0134-4es_ES
dc.identifier.e-issn1742-9994-
dc.relation.csices_ES
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