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Title

Correlated genetic effects on reproduction define a domestication syndrome in a forest tree

AuthorsSantos-del-Blanco, Luis; Alía, Ricardo; Sampedro Pérez, Luis ; Lario, F.; Climent, José; González-Martínez, Santiago C.
Issue DateMar-2015
PublisherWiley-Blackwell
CitationEvolutionary Applications 8 (4): 403- 410 (2015)
AbstractCompared to natural selection, domestication implies a dramatic change in traits linked to fitness. A number of traits conferring fitness in the wild might be detrimental under domestication, and domesticated species typically differ from their ancestors in a set of traits known as the domestication syndrome. Specifically, trade-offs between growth and reproduction are well established across the tree of life. According to allocation theory, selection for growth rate is expected to indirectly alter life-history reproductive traits, diverting resources from reproduction to growth. Here we tested this hypothesis by examining the genetic change and correlated responses of reproductive traits as a result of selection for timber yield in the tree Pinus pinaster. Phenotypic selection was carried out in a natural population, and progenies from selected trees were compared with those of control trees in a common garden experiment. According to expectations, we detected a genetic change in important life-history traits due to selection. Specifically, threshold sizes for reproduction were much higher and reproductive investment relative to size significantly lower in the selected progenies just after a single artificial selection event. Our study helps to define the domestication syndrome in exploited forest trees and shows that changes affecting developmental pathways are relevant in domestication processes of long-lived plants.
Publisher version (URL)http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/eva.12252
URIhttp://hdl.handle.net/10261/122499
DOI10.1111/eva.12252
Identifiersdoi: 10.1111/eva.12252
issn: 1752-4571
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