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dc.contributor.authorVillagrasa, Marta-
dc.contributor.authorGuillamón, Miriam-
dc.contributor.authorLabandeira Robés, Ana Mª-
dc.contributor.authorTaberner, Andreu-
dc.contributor.authorEljarrat, Ethel-
dc.contributor.authorBarceló, Damià-
dc.date.accessioned2009-03-24T11:40:07Z-
dc.date.available2009-03-24T11:40:07Z-
dc.date.issued2006-06-24-
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Agriculture and Food Chemistry 54(4):1009-1015(2006)en_US
dc.identifier.issn0021-8561-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10261/11813-
dc.description7 pages, 4 figures, 2 tables.en_US
dc.description.abstractIn this study, the distribution of eight allelochemicals among the foliage, roots, and seeds of different wheat varieties is reported for two different sampling campaigns, corresponding to two consecutive years. The determination of benzoxazinoid derivatives was performed by combining pressurized liquid extraction−solid-phase extraction followed by liquid chromatography−electrospray mass spectrometry. To the authors' knowledge, there are no previous works about the content of allelochemicals in seed tissue of germinated wheat seedlings. Allelochemicals found in seeds were detected at levels similar to those found in foliage and roots. The results showed that the type of metabolites detected depends strongly on the working up procedure of the plant material, as well as of plant growth stage. A general decrease of the total amount of allelochemical content in the plants was observed with plant age. There was a significant difference in the total amount of benzoxazinoid derivatives in the different wheat varieties analyzeden_US
dc.description.sponsorshipWe thank Prof. D. Sicker (University of Leipzig), Prof. S. Chilton (University of North Carolina), Dr. F. Macias (University of Cadiz), Prof. Dr. Hajime Iwamura (Kyoto University), and Prof. Dr. Lisbeth Jonsson (So¨derto¨rn University College) for kindly providing standards and Dr. V. Cambier (Universite´ Catholique de Louvain) and Dr. C. Werner (University of Zurich) for helpful discussions. We greatly appreciate the generous gift of the Phenomenex Synergi MAX-RP HPLC column from Daniel Lopez (JASCO Analytica, Spain) and technical assistance provided by D. Fanjul and R. Chaler (IIQAB-CSIC). Finally, we thank Merck for supplying the SPE cartridges.en_US
dc.format.extent19968 bytes-
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/msword-
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisherAmerican Chemical Societyen_US
dc.rightsclosedAccessen_US
dc.subjectAllelochemicalsen_US
dc.subjectHydroxamic acidsen_US
dc.subjectWheat varietiesen_US
dc.subjectFoliageen_US
dc.subjectRootsen_US
dc.subjectSeedsen_US
dc.titleBenzoxazinoid Allelochemicals in Wheat: Distribution among Foliage, Roots, and Seedsen_US
dc.typeArtículoen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1021/jf050898h-
dc.description.peerreviewedPeer revieweden_US
dc.relation.publisherversionhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1021/jf050898hen_US
dc.identifier.e-issn1520-5118-
Appears in Collections:(IDAEA) Artículos
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