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dc.contributor.authorGarcía-Navas, Vicente-
dc.contributor.authorOrtego, Joaquín-
dc.contributor.authorSanz, Juan José-
dc.date.issued2009-
dc.identifier.citationProceedings of the Royal Society of London - B 276: 2931-2940 (2009)es_ES
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10261/110484-
dc.description.abstractThe general hypothesis of mate choice based on non-additive genetic traits suggests that individuals would gain important benefits by choosing genetically dissimilar mates (compatible mate hypothesis) and/or more heterozygous mates (heterozygous mate hypothesis). In this study, we test these hypotheses in a socially monogamous bird, the blue tit (Cyanistes caeruleus). We found no evidence for a relatednessbased mating pattern, but heterozygosity was positively correlated between social mates, suggesting that blue tits may base their mating preferences on partner’s heterozygosity. We found evidence that the observed heterozygosity-based assortative mating could be maintained by both direct and indirect benefits. Heterozygosity reflected individual quality in both sexes: egg production and quality increased with female heterozygosity while more heterozygous males showed higher feeding rates during the broodrearing period. Further, estimated offspring heterozygosity correlated with both paternal and maternal heterozygosity, suggesting that mating with heterozygous individuals can increase offspring genetic quality. Finally, plumage crown coloration was associated with male heterozygosity, and this could explain unanimous mate preferences for highly heterozygous and more ornamented individuals. Overall, this study suggests that non-additive genetic traits may play an important role in the evolution of mating preferences and offers empirical support to the resolution of the lek paradox from the perspective of the heterozygous mate hypothesis.es_ES
dc.language.isoenges_ES
dc.publisherRoyal Society (Great Britain)es_ES
dc.rightsclosedAccesses_ES
dc.subjectassortative matinges_ES
dc.subjectblue tites_ES
dc.subjectgenetic diversityes_ES
dc.subjectheterozygosityes_ES
dc.subjectrelatednesses_ES
dc.titleHeterozygosity-based assortative mating in blue tits (Cyanistes caeruleus): implications for the evolution of mate choicees_ES
dc.typeartículoes_ES
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1098/rspb.2009.0417-
dc.description.peerreviewedPeer reviewedes_ES
dc.relation.publisherversionhttp://rspb.royalsocietypublishing.org/content/276/1669/2931es_ES
dc.relation.csices_ES
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