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dc.contributor.authorLucena León, Carlos-
dc.contributor.authorTrapero Casas, José Luis-
dc.contributor.authorRemesal, Efrén-
dc.contributor.authorNavas Cortés, Juan Antonio-
dc.date.accessioned2014-05-21T10:08:47Z-
dc.date.available2014-05-21T10:08:47Z-
dc.date.issued2013-05-
dc.identifier.citation11th International Verticillium Symposium (2013)-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10261/97004-
dc.descriptionPonencia presentada en el 11 th International Verticillium Symposium, celebrado en Göttingen (Alemania) del 5 al 8 de mayo de 2013.-
dc.description.abstractGlobal climate variability and change caused by natural processes as well as anthropogenic factors are major environmental issues in the 21st century. The increase in mean temperatures, change in precipitation regimes, and a continuous increase in CO2 concentration are likely the main scientific evidence of climate change in recent decades. Plant disease epidemics result from specific interactions of a susceptible host plant, a prevalent and virulent pathogen and a conducive environment. Consequently, shifts in any one of these components can change geographic distribution and disease expression in a given pathosystem. Verticillium wilt (VW) of olive caused by the soil-borne fungus Verticillium dahliae is of major concern for the olive industry in the Mediterranean basin, mainly due to the rapid and wide spread of the highly virulent defoliating (D) pathotype. In this work, we have evaluated the effect of temperature and CO2 concentration on virulence of V. dahliae pathotypes and olive cultivars interactions.-
dc.publisherDeutsche Phytomedizinische Gesellschaft-
dc.rightsclosedAccess-
dc.titleVerticillium dahliae pathotypes and olive cultivars determine geographic distribution and development of Verticillium wilt under current and future climate change scenarios in Southern Spain-
dc.typecomunicación de congreso-
dc.date.updated2014-05-21T10:08:47Z-
dc.description.versionPeer Reviewed-
dc.language.rfc3066eng-
Appears in Collections:(IAS) Comunicaciones congresos
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