English   español  
Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10261/73318
Share/Impact:
Statistics
logo share SHARE logo core CORE   Add this article to your Mendeley library MendeleyBASE

Visualizar otros formatos: MARC | Dublin Core | RDF | ORE | MODS | METS | DIDL
Exportar a otros formatos:
Title

Large-scale temperature response to external forcing in simulations and reconstructions of the last millennium

AuthorsFernández-Donado, Laura ; González-Rouco, J. F. ; Raible, C. C.; Ammann, M.; Barriopedro, David ; García-Bustamante, Elena; Jungclaus, J. H.; Lorenz, S. J.; Lutherbacher, J.; Phipps, S. J.; Servonnat, J.; Swingedouw, Didier; Tett, S. F. B.; Wagner, S.; Yiou, P.; Zorita, Eduardo
KeywordsClimate
Clima
Issue Date14-Feb-2013
PublisherEuropean Geosciences Union
Copernicus Publications
CitationFernández-Donado, L., González-Rouco, J. F., Raible, C. C., Ammann, C. M., Barriopedro, D., García-Bustamante, E., Jungclaus, J. H., Lorenz, S. J., Luterbacher, J., Phipps, S. J., Servonnat, J., Swingedouw, D., Tett, S. F. B., Wagner, S., Yiou, P., and Zorita, E.: Large-scale temperature response to external forcing in simulations and reconstructions of the last millennium, Climate of the Past, 9, 393-421, doi:10.5194/cp-9-393-2013, 2013.
AbstractUnderstanding natural climate variability and its driving factors is crucial to assessing future climate change. Therefore, comparing proxy-based climate reconstructions with forcing factors as well as comparing these with paleoclimate model simulations is key to gaining insights into the relative roles of internal versus forced variability. A review of the state of modelling of the climate of the last millennium prior to the CMIP5–PMIP3 (Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5–Paleoclimate Modelling Intercomparison Project Phase 3) coordinated effort is presented and compared to the available temperature reconstructions. Simulations and reconstructions broadly agree on reproducing the major temperature changes and suggest an overall linear response to external forcing on multidecadal or longer timescales. Internal variability is found to have an important influence at hemispheric and global scales. The spatial distribution of simulated temperature changes during the transition from the Medieval Climate Anomaly to the Little Ice Age disagrees with that found in the reconstructions. Thus, either internal variability is a possible major player in shaping temperature changes through the millennium or the model simulations have problems realistically representing the response pattern to external forcing. A last millennium transient climate response (LMTCR) is defined to provide a quantitative framework for analysing the consistency between simulated and reconstructed climate. Beyond an overall agreement between simulated and reconstructed LMTCR ranges, this analysis is able to single out specific discrepancies between some reconstructions and the ensemble of simulations. The disagreement is found in the cases where the reconstructions show reduced covariability with external forcings or when they present high rates of temperature change.
Publisher version (URL)http://dx.doi.org/10.5194/cp-9-393-2013
URIhttp://hdl.handle.net/10261/73318
DOI10.5194/cp-9-393-2013
ISSN1814-9324
E-ISSN1814-9332
Appears in Collections:(IGEO) Artículos
Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat 
CP_2013_9_393.pdf6,24 MBAdobe PDFThumbnail
View/Open
Show full item record
Review this work
 

Related articles:


WARNING: Items in Digital.CSIC are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.