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dc.contributor.authorAlonso-Zarazaga, Miguel A.-
dc.contributor.authorAraujo, Rafael-
dc.contributor.authorRamos, M. Ángeles-
dc.date.accessioned2013-01-21T17:29:00Z-
dc.date.available2013-01-21T17:29:00Z-
dc.date.issued2012-05-23-
dc.identifier.citationPLoS ONE 7(5): 1-7es_ES
dc.identifier.issn1932-6203-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10261/64615-
dc.description7 paginas, 2 figuras, 1 table et al..es_ES
dc.description.abstractThe number of described species on the planet is about 1.9 million, with ca. 17,000 new species described annually, mostly from the tropics. However, taxonomy is usually described as a science in crisis, lacking manpower and funding, a politically acknowledged problem known as the Taxonomic Impediment. Using data from the Fauna Europaea database and the Zoological Record, we show that contrary to general belief, developed and heavily-studied parts of the world are important reservoirs of unknown species. In Europe, new species of multicellular terrestrial and freshwater animals are being discovered and named at an unprecedented rate: since the 1950s, more than 770 new species are on average described each year from Europe, which add to the 125,000 terrestrial and freshwater multicellular species already known in this region. There is no sign of having reached a plateau that would allow for the assessment of the magnitude of European biodiversity. More remarkably, over 60% of these new species are described by non-professional taxonomists. Amateurs are recognized as an essential part of the workforce in ecology and astronomy, but the magnitude of non-professional taxonomist contributions to alpha-taxonomy has not been fully realized until now. Our results stress the importance of developing a system that better supports and guides this formidable workforce, as we seek to overcome the Taxonomic Impediment and speed up the process of describing the planetary biodiversity before it is too late.es_ES
dc.description.sponsorshipWe thank Melina Verbeek, Fedor Steeman and Claire Basire (Fauna Europaea Project Bureau), and Anastasios Legakis, Trudy Brannan and Alfonso Navas Sanchez (Fauna Europaea Steering Committee) for their assistance in the implementation of the Fauna Europaea project. Three anonymous reviewers made constructive comments on the manuscript.es_ES
dc.language.isoenges_ES
dc.publisherPublic Library of Sciencees_ES
dc.relation.isversionofPublisher’s version-
dc.rightsopenAccesses_ES
dc.titleNew Species in the Old World: Europe as a Frontier in Biodiversity Exploration, a Test Bed for 21st Century Taxonomyes_ES
dc.typeArtículoes_ES
dc.description.peerreviewedPeer reviewedes_ES
dc.relation.publisherversionhttp://www.plosone.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0036881es_ES
dc.identifier.e-issn1932-6203-
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