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Title

Impacts of the Tropical Pacific/Indian Oceans on the Seasonal Cycle of the West African Monsoon

AuthorsMohino, E.; Rodríguez-Fonseca, Belén ; Mechoso, C. R.; Gervois, S.; Chauvin, F.
KeywordsMonsoons
Rainfall
Indian ocean
Teleconnections
Africa
Sea surface temperature
Subsidence
Issue DateAug-2011
PublisherAmerican Meteorological Society
CitationMohino, E., B. Rodríguez-Fonseca, C. R. Mechoso, S. Gervois, P. Ruti, F. Chauvin, 2011: Impacts of the Tropical Pacific/Indian Oceans on the Seasonal Cycle of the West African Monsoon. Journal of Climate, 24, 3878–3891. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1175/2011JCLI3988.1
AbstractThe current consensus is that drought has developed in the Sahel during the second half of the twentieth century as a result of remote effects of oceanic anomalies amplified by local land–atmosphere interactions. This paper focuses on the impacts of oceanic anomalies upon West African climate and specifically aims to identify those from SST anomalies in the Pacific/Indian Oceans during spring and summer seasons, when they were significant. Idealized sensitivity experiments are performed with four atmospheric general circulation models (AGCMs). The prescribed SST patterns used in the AGCMs are based on the leading mode of covariability between SST anomalies over the Pacific/Indian Oceans and summer rainfall over West Africa. The results show that such oceanic anomalies in the Pacific/Indian Ocean lead to a northward shift of an anomalous dry belt from the Gulf of Guinea to the Sahel as the season advances. In the Sahel, the magnitude of rainfall anomalies is comparable to that obtained by other authors using SST anomalies confined to the proximity of the Atlantic Ocean. The mechanism connecting the Pacific/Indian SST anomalies with West African rainfall has a strong seasonal cycle. In spring (May and June), anomalous subsidence develops over both the Maritime Continent and the equatorial Atlantic in response to the enhanced equatorial heating. Precipitation increases over continental West Africa in association with stronger zonal convergence of moisture. In addition, precipitation decreases over the Gulf of Guinea. During the monsoon peak (July and August), the SST anomalies move westward over the equatorial Pacific and the two regions where subsidence occurred earlier in the seasons merge over West Africa. The monsoon weakens and rainfall decreases over the Sahel, especially in August.
URIhttp://hdl.handle.net/10261/61213
DOI10.1175/2011JCLI3988.1
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