DSpace

Digital.CSIC > Recursos Naturales > Centro de Estudios Avanzados de Blanes (CEAB) > (CEAB) Artículos >

Share

EndNote

Impact

Open Access item Natural or Naturalized? Phylogeography Suggests That the Abundant Sea Urchin Arbacia lixula Is a Recent Colonizer of the Mediterranean.

Authors:Wangensteen, Owen S.
Turon, Xavier
Pérez-Portela, R.
Palacín, C.
Issue Date:2012
Publisher:Public Library of Science
Citation:Plos One 7(9) : e45067 (2012)
Abstract:We present the global phylogeography of the black sea urchin Arbacia lixula, an amphi-Atlantic echinoid with potential to strongly impact shallow rocky ecosystems. Sequences of the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase gene of 604 specimens from 24 localities were obtained, covering most of the distribution area of the species, including the Mediterranean and both shores of the Atlantic. Genetic diversity measures, phylogeographic patterns, demographic parameters and population differentiation were analysed. We found high haplotype diversity but relatively low nucleotide diversity, with 176 haplotypes grouped within three haplogroups: one is shared between Eastern Atlantic (including Mediterranean) and Brazilian populations, the second is found in Eastern Atlantic and the Mediterranean and the third is exclusively from Brazil. Significant genetic differentiation was found between Brazilian, Eastern Atlantic and Mediterranean regions, but no differentiation was found among Mediterranean sub-basins or among Eastern Atlantic sub-regions. The star-shaped topology of the haplotype network and the unimodal mismatch distributions of Mediterranean and Eastern Atlantic samples suggest that these populations have suffered very recent demographic expansions. These expansions could be dated 94–205 kya in the Mediterranean, and 31–67 kya in the Eastern Atlantic. In contrast, Brazilian populations did not show any signature of population expansion. Our results indicate that all populations of A. lixula constitute a single species. The Brazilian populations probably diverged from an Eastern Atlantic stock. The present-day genetic structure of the species in Eastern Atlantic and the Mediterranean is shaped by very recent demographic processes. Our results support the view (backed by the lack of fossil record) that A. lixula is a recent thermophilous colonizer which spread throughout the Mediterranean during a warm period of the Pleistocene, probably during the last interglacial. Implications for the possible future impact of A. lixula on shallow Mediterranean ecosystems in the context of global warming trends must be considered.
Description:16 páginas, 9 tablas, 6 figuras.
Publisher version (URL):http://dx.doi.org/e45067. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0045067
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/10261/56528
ISSN:1932-6203
Appears in Collections:(CEAB) Artículos

Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.