English   español  
Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10261/22535
Share/Impact:
Statistics
logo share SHARE logo core CORE   Add this article to your Mendeley library MendeleyBASE

Visualizar otros formatos: MARC | Dublin Core | RDF | ORE | MODS | METS | DIDL
Exportar a otros formatos:
Title

Fractionation of potentially toxic elements in urban soils from five european cities by means of a harmonised sequential extraction procedure

AuthorsDavidson, C.M.; Urquhart, G.J.; Ajmone-Marsan, F.; Biasioli, M.; Duarte, A. D.; Díaz Barrientos, Encarnación ; Grcman, H.; Hossack, L.; Hursthouse, A.S.; Madrid, Luis ; Rodrigues, Sónia M.; Zurpan, M.
KeywordsPotentially toxic elements
Potentially toxic metals
Urban soil
Sequential extraction
Issue Date23-Feb-2006
PublisherElsevier
CitationAnalytica Chimica Acta 565: 63–72, (2006)
AbstractThe revised (four-step) BCR sequential extraction procedure has been applied to fractionate the chromium, copper, iron, manganese, nickel, lead and zinc contents in urban soil samples from public-access areas in five European cities. A preliminary inter-laboratory comparison was conducted and showed that data obtained by different laboratories participating in the study were sufficiently harmonious for comparisons to be made between cities and land types (e.g. parks, roadside, riverbanks, etc.). Analyte recoveries by sequential extraction, with respect to direct aqua regia digestion, were generally acceptable (100±15%). Iron, nickel and, at most sites, chromium were found mainly in association with the residual phase of the soil matrix. Copper was present in the reducible, oxidisable and residual fractions, whilst zinc was found in all four sequential extracts. Manganese was strongly associated with reducible material as, in some cities, was lead. This is of concern because high lead concentrations were present in some soils (>500 mg kg−1) and the potential exists for remobilisation under reducing conditions. As would be expected, extractable metal contents were generally highest in older, more heavily industrialised cities. Copper, lead and zinc showed marked (and often correlated) variations in concentrations between sites within the same city whereas manganese and, especially, iron, did not. No overall relationships were, however, found between analyte concentrations and land use, nor between analyte partitioning and land use.
Publisher version (URL)http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/B6TF4-4JBB30K-8/2/be8678c629d3ced878c735fe6104d8f6
URIhttp://hdl.handle.net/10261/22535
DOI10.1016/j.aca.2006.02.014
ISSN0003-2670
Appears in Collections:(IRNAS) Artículos
Files in This Item:
There are no files associated with this item.
Show full item record
Review this work
 

Related articles:


WARNING: Items in Digital.CSIC are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.