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Closed Access item Climate forcing and Neanderthal extinction in Southern Iberia: insights from a multiproxy marine record.

Authors:Jimenez Espejo, Francisco J.
Martínez-Ruiz, Francisca
Finlayson, Clive
Paytan, Adina
Sakamoto, Tatsuhiko
Ortega-Huertas, M.
Finlayson, Geraldine
Lijima, Koichi
Gallego-Torres, David
Fa, Darren A.
Issue Date:Apr-2007
Publisher:Elsevier
Citation:Quaternary Science Reviews 26(7-8): 836-852 (2007)
Abstract:Paleoclimate records from the western Mediterranean have been used to further understand the role of climatic changes in the replacement of archaic human populations inhabiting South Iberia. Marine sediments from the Balearic basin (ODP Site 975) was analysed at high resolution to obtain both geochemical and mineralogical data. These data were compared with climate records from nearby areas. Baexcces was used to characterize marine productivity and then related to climatic variability. Since variations in productivity were the consequence of climatic oscillations, climate/productivity events have been established. Sedimentary regime, primary marine productivity and oxygen conditions at the time of population replacement were reconstructed by means of a multiproxy approach. Climatic/oceanographic variations correlate well with Homo spatial and occupational patterns in Southern Iberia. It was found that low ventilation (U/Th), high river supply (Mg/Al), low aridity (Zr/Al) and low values of Baexcess coefficient of variation, may be linked with Neanderthal hospitable conditions. We attempt to support recent findings which claim that Neanderthals populations continued to inhabit southern Iberia between 30 and 28 ky cal BP and that this persistence was due to the specific characteristics of South Iberian climatic refugia. Comparisons of our data with other marine and continental records appear to indicate that conditions in South Iberia were highly inhospitable at 24 ky cal BP. Thus, it is proposed that the final disappearance of Neanderthals in this region could be linked with these extreme conditions.
Description:6 figures, 1 table
Publisher version (URL):http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.quascirev.2006.12.013
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/10261/18513
ISSN:84-609-1497-6
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Appears in Collections:(IACT) Artículos

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