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dc.contributor.authorAnnenkova, Nataliia V.-
dc.contributor.authorAhrén, Dag-
dc.contributor.authorLogares, Ramiro-
dc.contributor.authorKremp, Anke-
dc.contributor.authorRengefors, Karin-
dc.date.accessioned2018-09-17T10:37:42Z-
dc.date.available2018-09-17T10:37:42Z-
dc.date.issued2018-08-
dc.identifierdoi: 10.1111/jpy.12748-
dc.identifierissn: 0022-3646-
dc.identifiere-issn: 1529-8817-
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Phycology 54(4): 571-576 (2018)-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10261/169795-
dc.description6 pages, 2 figures, supporting information https://doi.org/10.1111/jpy.12748-
dc.description.abstractRecently radiated dinoflagellates Apocalathium aciculiferum (collected in Lake Erken, Sweden), Apocalathium malmogiense (Baltic Sea) and Apocalathium aff. malmogiense (Highway Lake, Antarctica) represent a lineage with an unresolved phylogeny. We determined their phylogenetic relationships using phylotranscriptomics based on 792 amino acid sequences. Our results showed that A. aciculiferum diverged from the other two closely related lineages, consistent with their different morphologies in cell size, relative cell length and presence of spines. We hypothesized that A. aff. malmogiense and A. malmogiense, which inhabit different hemispheres, are evolutionarily more closely related because they diverged from a marine common ancestor, adapting to a wide salinity range, while A. aciculiferum colonized a freshwater habitat, by acquiring adaptations to this environment, in particular, salinity intolerance. We show that phylotranscriptomics can resolve the phylogeny of recently diverged protists. This has broad relevance, given that many phytoplankton species are morphologically very similar, and single genes sometimes lack the information to determine species’ relationships-
dc.description.sponsorshipThe work was supported through the Russian Foundation for Basic Research (project # 16-04-01704) to NA and a Swedish Research Council grant (2012-10-24) to KR as well as the marine microbial eukaryote transcriptome sequencing project (MMETSP) of the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation-
dc.publisherPhycological Society of America-
dc.rightsclosedAccess-
dc.subjectInternal transcribed spacer-2-
dc.subjectITS2-
dc.subjectCytochrome b-
dc.subjectCOB-
dc.subjectBootstrap support-
dc.subjectBS-
dc.subjectProtists-
dc.subjectAdaptive radiation-
dc.subjectTranscriptome-
dc.subjectPhylogenomics-
dc.subjectMicroalgae-
dc.subjectHigh Throughput Sequencing-
dc.titleDelineating closely related dinoflagellate lineages using phylotranscriptomics-
dc.typeartículo-
dc.relation.publisherversionhttps://doi.org/10.1111/jpy.12748-
dc.date.updated2018-09-17T10:37:42Z-
dc.description.versionPeer Reviewed-
dc.language.rfc3066eng-
dc.contributor.funderGordon and Betty Moore Foundation-
dc.contributor.funderSwedish Research Council-
dc.contributor.funderRussian Foundation for Basic Research-
dc.relation.csic-
dc.identifier.funderhttp://dx.doi.org/10.13039/501100002261es_ES
dc.identifier.funderhttp://dx.doi.org/10.13039/100000936es_ES
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