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Title

Climate impacts on global hot spots of marine biodiversity

AuthorsRamírez, Francisco ; Afán, Isabel ; Davis, Lloyd S.; Chiaradia, André
Issue Date1-Feb-2017
PublisherAmerican Association for the Advancement of Science
CitationScience Advances 3(2): e1601198 (2017)
AbstractHuman activities drive environmental changes at scales that could potentially cause ecosystem collapses in the marine environment. We combined information on marine biodiversity with spatial assessments of the impacts of climate change to identify the key areas to prioritize for the conservation of global marine biodiversity. This process identified six marine regions of exceptional biodiversity based on global distributions of 1729 species of fish, 124 marine mammals, and 330 seabirds. Overall, these hot spots of marine biodiversity coincide with areas most severely affected by global warming. In particular, these marine biodiversity hot spots have undergone local to regional increasing water temperatures, slowing current circulation, and decreasing primary productivity. Furthermore, when we overlapped these hot spots with available industrial fishery data, albeit coarser than our estimates of climate impacts, they suggest a worrying coincidence whereby the world’s richest areas for marine biodiversity are also those areas mostly affected by both climate change and industrial fishing. In light of these findings, we offer an adaptable framework for determining local to regional areas of special concern for the conservation of marine biodiversity. This has exposed the need for finer-scaled fishery data to assist in the management of global fisheries if the accumulative, but potentially preventable, effect of fishing on climate change impacts is to be minimized within areas prioritized for marine biodiversity conservation.
Publisher version (URL)https://doi.org/10.1126/sciadv.1601198
URIhttp://hdl.handle.net/10261/163536
DOI10.1126/sciadv.1601198
E-ISSN2375-2548
Appears in Collections:(EBD) Artículos
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