English   español  
Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10261/161569
Share/Impact:
Statistics
logo share SHARE logo core CORE   Add this article to your Mendeley library MendeleyBASE

Visualizar otros formatos: MARC | Dublin Core | RDF | ORE | MODS | METS | DIDL
Exportar a otros formatos:
Title

Reducing light-induced mortality of seabirds: High pressure sodium lights decrease the fatal attraction of shearwaters

AuthorsRodríguez, Airam ; Dann, Peter; Chiaradia, André
KeywordsArtificial light
Fledging
Illumination
Light pollution
Mortality
Seabird
Issue DateSep-2017
PublisherElsevier
CitationJournal of nature Conservation, 39: 68-72 (2017)
AbstractThe use of artificial light at night and its ecological consequences are increasing around the world. Light pollution can lead to massive mortality episodes for nocturnally active petrels, one of the most threatened avian groups. Some fledglings can be attracted or disoriented by artificial light on their first flights. Studies testing the effect of artificial light characteristics on attractiveness to seabirds have not provided conclusive results and there is some urgency as some endangered petrel species experience high light-induced mortality. We designed a field experiment to test the effect of three common outdoor lighting systems with different light spectra (high pressure sodium, metal halide and light emitting diode) on the number and the body condition of grounded fledglings of the short-tailed shearwater Ardenna tenuirostris. A total of 235 birds was grounded during 99 experimental hours (33 h for each treatment). 47% of birds was grounded when metal halide lights were on, while light emitting diode and high pressure sodium lights showed lower percentages of attraction (29% and 24%). Metal halide multiplied the mortality risk by a factor of 1.6 and 1.9 respectively in comparison with light emitting diode and high pressure sodium lights. No differences in body condition were detected among the birds grounded by the different lighting systems. We recommend the adoption of high pressure sodium lights (or with similar spectra) into petrel-friendly lighting designs together with other light mitigation measures such as light attenuation, lateral shielding to reduce spill and appropriate orientation.
Publisher version (URL)https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jnc.2017.07.001
URIhttp://hdl.handle.net/10261/161569
DOI10.1016/j.jnc.2017.07.001
Appears in Collections:(EBD) Artículos
Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat 
Rodriguez et al 2017 J Nature Conservation.pdf Embargoed until July 16, 2019447,02 kBAdobe PDFThumbnail
View/Open    Request a copy
Show full item record
 

Related articles:


WARNING: Items in Digital.CSIC are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.