English   español  
Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10261/147551
Share/Impact:
Statistics
logo share SHARE logo core CORE   Add this article to your Mendeley library MendeleyBASE

Visualizar otros formatos: MARC | Dublin Core | RDF | ORE | MODS | METS | DIDL
Exportar a otros formatos:

Title

Discovery of mass migration and breeding of the paintedlady butterfly Vanessa cardui in the Sub-Sahara: the Europe-Africa migration revisited

AuthorsTalavera, Gerard ; Vila, Roger
KeywordsTropical region
Savannah
Painted lady
Nymphalidae
Lepidoptera
Intertropical Convergence Zone
Biogeography
Intercontinental movement
Insect
Climate
Issue Date1-Feb-2016
PublisherOxford University Press
CitationBiological Journal of the Linnean Society 120(2): 274-285 (2016)
AbstractMigratory behaviour has repeatedly evolved across taxa as an adaptation to heterogeneity in space and time.However, insect migration is still poorly understood, partly because of the lack of field data. The painted ladybutterfly Vanessa cardui undertakes a long-distance annual migration between Europe and Africa. While springflights from the Maghreb to Europe are well characterized, it is not known how far the European autumnmigrants travel into Africa and whether they massively cross the Sahara Desert. We conducted fieldwork in fourAfrican countries (Chad, Benin, Senegal, and Ethiopia) in autumn and documented southward migrants incentral Chad and abundant breeding sites across the tropical savannah as far south as the Niger River in thewest and the Ethiopian highlands in the east. Given directionality and timing, these migrants probablyoriginated in Europe and crossed the Mediterranean, the Sahara and the Sahel, a hypothesis that implies thelongest (>4000 km) migratory flight recorded for a butterfly in a single generation. In the light of the newevidence, we revise the prevailing spatiotemporal model for the annual migration of V. cardui to incorporatetropical Africa, which could potentially be regarded as the missing geographic link between autumn (southwards)and spring (northwards) movements. © 2016 The Linnean Society of London, Biological Journal of the LinneanSociety, 2016.
Publisher version (URL)http://doi.org/10.1111/bij.12873
URIhttp://hdl.handle.net/10261/147551
DOI10.1111/bij.12873
Identifiersissn: 0024-4066
e-issn: 1095-8312
Appears in Collections:(IBE) Artículos
Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat 
vanessa_cardui_Talavera.pdf1,26 MBAdobe PDFThumbnail
View/Open
Show full item record
Review this work
 


WARNING: Items in Digital.CSIC are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.