English   español  
Por favor, use este identificador para citar o enlazar a este item: http://hdl.handle.net/10261/143588
Compartir / Impacto:
Estadísticas
Add this article to your Mendeley library MendeleyBASE
 |  Ver citas en Google académico
Visualizar otros formatos: MARC | Dublin Core | RDF | ORE | MODS | METS | DIDL
Exportar otros formatos: Exportar EndNote (RIS)Exportar EndNote (RIS)Exportar EndNote (RIS)
Título

Clutch-size variation in Western Palaearctic secondary hole-nesting passerine birds in relation to nest box design

Autor Møller, Anders Pape; Merino, Santiago ; Morales, Judith; Moreno Klemming, Juan
Palabras clave Nest box floor area
Longitude
Nest boxmaterial
Geographic location
Habitat
Latitude
Fecha de publicación abr-2014
EditorJohn Wiley & Sons
British Ecological Society
Citación Methods in Ecology and Evolution 5(4): 353-362 (2014)
ResumenSecondary hole-nesting birds that do not construct nest holes themselves and hence regularly breed in nest boxes constitute important model systems for field studies in many biological disciplines with hundreds of scientists and amateurs involved. Those research groups are spread over wide geographic areas that experience considerable variation in environmental conditions, and researchers provide nest boxes of varying designs that may inadvertently introduce spatial and temporal variation in reproductive parameters. We quantified the relationship between mean clutch size and nest box size and material after controlling for a range of environmental variables in four of the most widely used model species in the Western Palaearctic: great tit Parus major, blue tit Cyanistes caeruleus, pied flycatcher Ficedula hypoleuca and collared flycatcher F. albicollis from 365 populations and 79 610 clutches. Nest floor area and nest box material varied non-randomly across latitudes and longitudes, showing that scientists did not adopt a random box design. Clutch size increased with nest floor area in great tits, but not in blue tits and flycatchers. Clutch size of blue tits was larger in wooden than in concrete nest boxes. These findings demonstrate that the size of nest boxes and material used to construct nest boxes can differentially affect clutch size in different species. The findings also suggest that the nest box design may affect not only focal species, but also indirectly other species through the effects of nest box design on productivity and therefore potentially population density and hence interspecific competition. © 2014 The Authors. Methods in Ecology and Evolution © 2014 British Ecological Society.
Descripción Møller, A.P. [et al.]
URI http://hdl.handle.net/10261/143588
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1111/2041-210X.12160
Identificadoresdoi: 10.1111/2041-210X.12160
issn: 2041-210X
Aparece en las colecciones: (MNCN) Artículos
Ficheros en este ítem:
Fichero Descripción Tamaño Formato  
accesoRestringido.pdf15,38 kBAdobe PDFVista previa
Visualizar/Abrir
Mostrar el registro completo
 


NOTA: Los ítems de Digital.CSIC están protegidos por copyright, con todos los derechos reservados, a menos que se indique lo contrario.